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Past Courses

2017

Spring 2017


 

591. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(By arrangement. Special permission required, Index 04776)

 

593. STUDIES IN CHAPS: CULTURE, PRESERVATION AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST

(CAC, M67, 4:30-7:30, VH 001, Section: 01, Kahlaoui, Index 15063)

This course is cross listed with 01:082:441:01 and 01:506:301:01

The Middle East is one of the richest archeological regions in the world. Yet, ironically, military conflicts aimed at establishing stability in the area have contributed to the deterioration of cultural artifacts and sites at an alarming rate. Military action, political indifference, and a vacuum of knowledge – linguistic, artistic, political, and cultural – have endangered the possibilities for preserving the essence of Middle Eastern art and archaeology and the roots of western European tradition. This course is about war and cultural heritage, politics and preservation as the new realities of our future. This course begins with a review of similar situations of war and art, from napoleon to World War II and Vietnam (“we had to destroy it in order to save it”). Our work then moves quickly to a discussion of Middle Eastern art and archaeology, including the sack of the Iraq museum in Baghdad and the looting of sites in the countryside throughout the region. Half of the course is devoted to understanding both the art and archaeology of the region, and the other half is devoted to tracing their fate and their future under the challenge of present circumstances. This course will answer two questions. The first is: what do we need to know about the art history of Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Afghanistan?  The second is:  what are the threats to its survival for future generations?  The course targets art history and CHAPS students. It will emphasize both visual approaches and preservation practices, and their relation to the respective social environments.


Requirements will include informal discussion of common readings, oral reports on specific issues, and a 15-page research paper.

pdf Syllabus Kahlaoui (27 KB)

 

594. STUDIES IN CHAPS: CEMETERIES, MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS

(CAC, W67, 4:30-7:30, VH 001, Section: 01, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index 07853)

This course is cross listed with 01:082:441:02 and 01:506:391:02

This cultural heritage course explores the history and material culture of the memorialization of individuals, social groups, and historic events through time, cultures, and landscapes. Our course material will include local, national, and global case studies and examples drawn from the fields of cultural heritage, cultural resource management, historic preservation, archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, death studies, landscape architecture, and the contemporary world. Why and how do we choose to remember/memorialize some individuals and events over others? What does the form and design of cemeteries, monuments, and monuments reveal about communities, culture, politics, and cultural/historical memory? Which memorial sites and spaces stay secular – and which become sacred ground? How and when do acts of memorialization become vehicles for mediating and reinterpreting the past? How and why do some sites associated with the dead and historic events become contested ground while others are forgotten? What is the role and purpose of “dark tourism” and studies of “negative heritage” as part of remembering and forgetting in the contemporary world?

Attendance (includes participation/article introductions) 20%; Case Study Report 1  20%; Case Study Report 2 20%; Cemetery/Monument/or Memorial paper 20%;  Research Paper  20%                      

No prerequisites are required to join our course – undergraduates/graduates from all disciplines are welcome!

pdf Syllabus Woodhouse Beyer (42 KB)

 

603. ADVANCED TOPICS: CHAPS

(CAC, TH23, 09:50-12:50, VH 001, Rico, Index 07854)

This course is cross listed with 01:082:442:01 and 01:506:391:03

This course offers a critical overview of the variety of methods that are used in the identification, documentation and management of cultural heritage. Students will engage with the different types of heritage sources and disciplines that define this subject of study in all its diversity, in order to discuss methods descriptively and critically. Each seminar we will consider the documentation of heritage from a different disciplinary vantage point and discuss the intimate relationship between methods, theories and standards used in cultural heritage. This course offers a venue and support for students to discuss and define more robust methodologies in their research papers and dissertations.

pdf Syllabus Rico (87 KB)

 

607. CHAPS ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, 07832)

 

708. RESEARCH CULTURAL HERITAGE (CHAPS)

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 08452)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

 

Crosslisted

Landscape Urbanism: Theories of Landscape Architecture

16:550:553, 3 credits
Mondays, 12:35 pm - 1:55 pm; Thursdays, 12:35 pm - 1:55 pm
Blake Hall 148
Instructor: Dr. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Landscape Urbanism has evolved as a buzzword to identify an interdisciplinary approach to shaping the urban environment. This seminar will explore cultural interpretations of landscape as context of that discourse allowing students to develop individual positions relevant to their respective fields.

pdf Syllabus Hoefer (6.79 MB)

 

Historic Preservation

Prof. Listokin

34:970:521, Index #05242

Thursdays, 6:10-8:40pm, Civic Square Bldg, room 261

 

International Historic Preservation

Prof. Listokin

34:970:522, index #11099

Tuesdays, 9:50am-12:30pm, Civic Square Bldg, room 173

2016


Spring 2016

 

DigitalStudies in CHAPS: Preserving the Past in the Digital Age: Museums, Monuments, and Cultural Management

(CAC, W 4:30-7:30, Spratt, Index 18723)
(01:082:441:01 / 16:082:593:01 / 01:506:391:01)

Course Description:

This course examines the current use and future potential of computers to analyze, curate, and digitally preserve monuments and material artifacts in an increasingly technologically reliant world. From the use of computers to make digital art and architectural reconstructions with photogrammetry, such as what researchers from the Initial Training Network of Digital Cultural Heritage have done with the recently destroyed monuments in Iraq, Egypt, and Nepal, to the application of vision technology to virtually create, categorize, and aesthetically assess artifacts in museums, libraries, and research institutions, it is clear that the role of technology in today’s cultural management industry can no longer be sidelined. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the current and future potential of digital preservation and heritage management, and to bring awareness to the ethical implications of both computer-based analysis of art and computer-based production of art. To this end, the course will examine the role of vision technology in negotiating our relationship with the past and its entanglement with our understanding of human perception itself. Students are expected to participate in two class trips, one to New York City to visit the New Museum and one to the Index of Christian Art at Princeton. This course is open to qualified undergraduates and graduate students with an interest in cultural heritage and preservation management, art history, philosophy, ethics, history of science, anthropology, archaeology, psychology, sociology, computer science, business administration, library and information science, and the digital humanities.

Course Goals:

  • -     To examine the current use of digital tools for art and cultural management.
  •       To consider the future use of digital tools for art and cultural management.
  • -    To bring awareness to the ethical debates surrounding the use of artificial intelligence in the art and cultural management industry.
  • -    To guide students in the use and development of new technologies.
  • -    To foster an awareness of the current debates surrounding the digital humanities and the increasingly digitized art and cultural management industry.
  • -    To enhance the ability of students to debate different sides of an argument surrounding this particular intersection of the arts and sciences in a constructive learning environment.
  • -     To promote analytical skills that are informed by historical understanding, academic and industry perspectives, ethical awareness, the theoretical foundations of the field, and contemporary debates of the subject.

Course Format and Assignments:

The course follows a seminar format. Students are expected to attend each class and to engage in discussion of the weekly readings. There will be weekly mini-presentations of the readings that will rotate amongst the seminar participants. A research paper on a topic of the student’s choice that ties into the larger themes of the seminar and is approved by the instructor is required (10-12 pages for undergraduates and 18-20 pages for graduates). Presentations of the student’s research will take place in the last two weeks of the semester. Attendance at guest lectures related to the course is mandatory.


significant object

STUDIES IN CHAPS: Significant Objects: Material Culture Studies and Cultural Heritage

(CAC, M 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index 11663)
(01:082:441:02 / 16:082:594:01 / 01:506:391:02)

There are no prerequisites in Art History required for this course.

Description:

How, when, and why are objects significant in the modern world? What are “significant” objects in the grand scope of history, museum collecting, and cultural heritage? To what extent are objects cultural mediators, social communicators, and political actors to communities, social groups, and nations? This seminar-based course explores the connections between material culture and cultural heritage through the diverse lenses of art history. anthropology, archaeology, history, material culture studies, museum studies, and heritage and preservation studies. Course discussion will include topics such as collecting, collections, and museums, globalization and cultural tourism, colonialism and post-colonialism, monuments and memorials, art/artifact “markets," repatriation and restitution, historic preservation and conservation, and the relationships between tangible and intangible heritage. 


 Laws

ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHAPS – Laws of Cultural Heritage and Preservation

(CAC, T 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Jacob, Index 08006)
(01:082:442:01 / 16:082:603:01 / 01:506:391:03)

In today’s world, the media is filled with accounts of deliberate destruction of art and artifacts, stolen and repatriated art and artifacts, art theft rings, and current troubles of museums.

Would you recognize the legal issues connected with these topics?   Art managers, law enforcement officers, and museum administrators regularly face such issues.

This course will acquaihttps://www.sas.rutgers.edu/cms/chaps/administrator/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&layout=editnt both CHAPS students and students interested in laws applicable to the art world in general, such as legal problems of museums as institutions, and legal obligations of dealers, auction houses and art merchants, and rights of private parties as owners of art. Other topics include the movement of cultural property in wartime, including public laws dealing with art, such as patrimony laws and UNESCO 1970, and statutory responses arising out of cultural heritage issues unique to the United States, such as the Native Americans Graves Repatriation Act, and national and local historic preservation laws. This course is designed for those pursuing a Master's or Doctoral Degree in Cultural Heritage and Preservation, Graduate Art History Students and students pursuing a Certificate in Museum Studies or Public History. Undergraduates who have completed the introductory Cultural Heritage and Preservation course are welcome to take this course with advance permission of the instructor. Two or three short papers (not exceeding three pages) on assigned topics, two quizzes, and a longer paper of the student's choosing are required.


Historic preservation 2

Historic Preservation

(CAC, Th 6:10 - 8:40 PM, CSB-261, Listokin)
(Undergrad: 10:762:448, index #05747)

Overview of the evolution of the historic preservation movement in the United States, examining the regulations, programs, and economics impacting historic preservation.

 

 


International historic preservation

International Historic Preservation

CAC, M 9:50 - 12:30 PM, CSB-173, Listokin)
(Undergrad:  10:762:484, index #14775)

Overview of the evolution of the historic preservation movement in an international context, examining the regulations, programs, and economics impacting historic preservation.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 Fall 2016


 

Archer530. SEMINAR IN GLOBAL CULTURAL HERITAGE

(CAC, W, 1:10-4:10, Art Library Seminar Room, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index 08046)

This seminar addresses crucial issues of conservation and preservation within the rapidly changing world of the 21st century. It is interdisciplinary in focus. Interested students from other majors/fields/disciplines are welcome. Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market. This seminar examines these issues within the context of current preservation theory and practice.

Issues to be addressed include: Who Owns the Past?; UNESCO and World Heritage; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting (museums, collectors, dealers); The Destruction of Cultural Heritage during War or Ethnic Conflict; Looting and willful destruction of Historic Sites and Buildings; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management

Course Goals:

• To define and identify current threats to the conservation of the monuments, sites, works of art and material culture that constitute our cultural heritage worldwide.

• To assess international and national initiatives being taken to protect cultural heritage, both tangible and intangible.

• To enable you to formulate, discuss, and defend your own values through critical analysis of the material covered and to become an effective advocate for the preservation of cultural heritage.

• To raise awareness of a flourishing field of Cultural Heritage Preservation and career opportunities within the field

• To encourage you to develop an international perspective that will enrich your future studies.

Course Requirements:

Attendance and Seminar Discussion (10%); Midterm Quiz (15%); 2 Student Report Presentations (30%); 1 Case Study Presentation (15%); Research Paper Presentation (15%); Research Paper (15%)

Attendance and Seminar Discussion/Presentations: Students are expected to attend all classes and to participate in class discussion. Throughout the semester, students will present (ungraded) brief reports on assigned readings and graded student report and case presentation topics to be researched on the Internet.

Readings:

Readings are available on our SAKAI site. They are designed to introduce you to cultural heritage issues.

In addition to the assigned reading, additional material will serve as a valuable resource for research topics. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with this material as it relates to their projects. The Internet, current newspapers, and periodicals are valuable resources that should be consulted regularly for research and to keep up to date on cultural property issues in general. There is a list of valuable Internet sites posted with the syllabus.

Midterm Quiz:

A midterm quiz will cover material (readings, presentations) presented in the first half of our course.

Research Paper/Research Paper Presentation:

Students will research and write a research paper of approximately 12-15 pages. Students registered for 082:430 should consult with the instructor to design a topic related both cultural heritage and to their particular focus within the Program in Art History, other major/field, and/or CHAPS.

Picture1590. INTERNSHIP: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(By arrangement; Special permission required; Index 04640)

 

Disaster593. CULTURAL HERITAGE AND DISASTERS: PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RESILIENCE

(CAC, W67, 4:30-7:30, VH 001, Woodhouse-Beyer, 14308)

COURSE DESCRIPTION

In the past, and throughout the contemporary era, natural and cultural disasters of local, national, and international scale have challenged cultural heritage sites and communities around the world. This seminar course considers a variety of disaster events, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, climate change, warfare/terrorism, and pandemics, and their effects on historic properties, archaeological sites, cultural landscapes, museum collections, communities, and cultures. Our seminar work will take a cultural resource management and historic preservation approach to the discussion of global case studies; strategies and protocols for disaster preparedness and post-disaster response/survey/preservation; post-disaster site and district assessment, restoration, and protection approaches and tools; and critical review and assessment of national and international cultural heritage disaster management plans.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

After taking this course, students enrolled in Cultural Heritage and Disasters: Preparedness, Response, and Resilience will be able to:

1. Understand the destructive effects of natural phenomena and cultural forces on cultural and historic properties, communities, and landscapes;

2. Evaluate the roles of local, state, national, and international agencies and organizations in disaster management planning, response, and mitigation;

3. Acquire a broad knowledge of the methods of damage assessment and disaster management mitigation principles concerning historic properties, archaeological sites, and communities affected by natural disasters;

4. Discuss and critique national and international approaches to disaster management and mitigation through the evaluation of case studies.

5. Consider the social, political, and economic implications of disasters, and disaster preparation and mitigation, on the preservation and restoration of the cultural heritage of local, national, and global communities.

Requirements: Attendance and Seminar Discussion (10%); 2 Case Presentations (30%); Midterm exam (20%); Research Paper (20%), Take home final exam (20%)

 

Historic preservation594. TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION: A SUSTAINABLE APPROACH

(CAC, W, 9:50-12:50, VH104, Hewitt, Index 08507)

This course, co-listed for graduate as well as undergraduate students, presents an alternative view of architectural conservation based upon the new schema of sustainability. Since buildings cannot be separated from their ecological and historical context, it makes sense to view their continued life as a part of the biosphere. Lectures will cover the history of architectural conservation during the first half of the course, and explore new concepts in preservation during the second half. Requirements include two exams and a research paper.

 

Spratt603. TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: (GLOBAL)HERITAGE AND THE ROLE OF THE MUSEUM

(CAC, M, 4:30-7:30, VH 001, Section: 01, Spratt, 08045)

This seminar examines the historical development of the museum as a cultural institution and its role in the construction of local and global conceptions of heritage. The course will pay particular attention to the ways in which the museum reflects a perspective of the world that is shaped by the valuation and systematization of our knowledge of it. We will explore the origins of the museum in relation to Renaissance art and nature collections and its epistemological foundations, in the culture of the Enlightenment, to its evolution as an arbiter of cultural patrimony in an increasingly globalized world. The role of museums in the identity politics of the modern nation-­‐state will be critically analyzed in the seminar through a series of case studies that will take us halfway around the globe. Through an investigation of museums from New York, Philadelphia, Salvador, Paris, Venice, Sofia, Corfu, Athens, to Moscow, the course will consider a broad range of themes including post-­‐colonialism, nationalism, heritage and identity formation, memory, nostalgia, authenticity, and the representation of alterity in the museum.

Picture1607. CHAPS ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 08896)

 

Picture1707. RESEARCH CULTURAL HERITAGE (CHAPS)

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 08766)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

2011

Fall 2011

530. Global Cultural Heritage (530, Index 32061)

Harvey (Mondays 1:00-3:40, VH001)

Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market. The goal of this seminar is to examine current threats to cultural property worldwide and to assess international and national initiatives to protect our global cultural heritage.

Issues we will examine include:

Who Owns the Past?; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management and Protection; UNESCO and World Heritage; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting; the Role and Purpose of Museums; Restitution-WW II and beyond; Cultural Tourism;; Philosophy and Practice in Conservation and Preservation. Requirements: Short oral reports on reading; Research paper and oral report.

This is an interdisciplinary graduate seminar. Qualified graduate students from other disciplines are welcome to apply. Limit 15 students.

Internship in Cultural Heritage Preservation (590, Index: 26190)

Prerequisites: N/A

Staff

by arrangement - Special Permission required

The Internship in Historic Preservation is the fifth of five required courses for the Certificate in Historic Preservation. This supervised internship is restricted to students enrolled in the certificate program.

Studies in CHAPS (593, Index: 32059)

Woodhouse-Beyer (Tuesdays 4:30-7:30, VH001)

How and why are objects significant in the modern world? What are “significant” objects in the grand scope of history, communities, and cultural heritage? To what extent are objects cultural mediators, social communicators, and political actors in the hand of individuals, communities, and nations? This seminar-based Cultural Heritage and Historic Preservation Studies course explores the connections between material culture and cultural heritage through the diverse lenses of anthropology, archaeology, material culture studies, and historic preservation. We will cover such topics as collecting and display, memory and memorialization, consumption and commercial branding, death and funerary objects, art/artifact “markets”, ethnicity and traditions, preservation and recycling, and tangible/intangible heritage. Students will be required to actively participate in seminar discussions, complete a midterm and final examination, and submit two short (4-5 page) topical assignments and a 12- 15 page end of semester research paper (accompanied by a short in-class presentation).

Studies in CHAPS: Architectural Conservation: A Sustainable Approach (594, Index: 33231)

Hewitt (Wed 9:50-12:30, VH001)

This course is an introduction to what we generally call architectural preservation, accounting for the history of the field over the centuries, the theories that have guided the development of the field, and the directions that conservation takes in current practice. Serious attention will be given to a sustainable approach to architecture, in keeping with economic, social, and practical requirements of contemporary life. The course material will consist of readings, discussion, lecture, and some site visits if they can be accommodated by the instructor. The textbook will be John Stubbs, "Time Honored: A Global View of Architectural Conservation," 2009. The instructor is the author of three scholarly books on the American country house, the architecture of Carrere and Hastings, and Gustave Stickley‘s Craftsman Farms, and many other publications. He is an architect with a busy practice that includes original designs and preservation projects.

Advanced Topics CHAPS: Law, Public Policy, and Ethics of Cultural Heritage Preservation (603, Index: 32060)

Jacob (Wednesdays 4:30-7:30, VH001)

The first section of this course is designed to acquaint graduate students with laws applicable to art in general, such as legal rights of artists,legal status of museums as institutions and fiduciary obligations of museum trustees, legal obligations of dealers, auction houses and art merchants, and rights of private parties as owners of art. Art management and museum work are replete with these everyday issues. The second section of the course will center on consideration of cultural property in wartime embodied in the Holocaust Survivors Act, the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import,Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property and its implementing United States legislation, and national patrimony laws. These have shifted the focus of cultural heritage preservation, creating a new area of study reflected in case law, which borrows from concepts studied in the first section of the course. The third section of the course will deal with legal responses within the United States arising out of concerns of cultural heritage, such as the Native Americans Graves Repatriation Act, and national and local historic preservation laws. The course will consider both the difficulty of promulgating uniform ethical codes, and the problems of translating public policy into viable, workable sets of legal standards. This course is designed for those pursuing a Master’s Degree in Cultural Heritage Preservation, as well as those graduate students pursuing a Certificate in Museum Studies. A series of short papers on assigned topics, two quizzes, and a long paper of the student‘s choosing will be required.

Research Cultural Heritage (707, Index: 34170)

By Arrangement, with permission

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Requirements and Grading: Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

 

Spring 2011

CORE COURSE

HISTORIC PRESERVATION STUDIO: ARCHITECTURE, HISTORY, PROGRAMS, AND POLICY (34:970:521)

Listokin and Listokin (Thursday 6:10-8:40 pm, Civic Square Building 369)

The scope of historic preservation has expanded significantly. An overview of historical evolution of the preservation movement in the United States, examining important public preservation regulations and programs and the economics of historic preservation.

Students wishing to substitute an equivalent course should contact the Program Director for approval.

________________________________________

ELECTIVES

INTERNSHIP IN CULTURAL HERITAGE/HISTORIC PRESERVATION (591, Index: 46942)

Prerequisites: N/A

Supervised internship or field study experience tailored to the student's area of specialization. The Internship in Historic Preservation is the fifth of five required courses for the Certificate in Historic Preservation. This supervised internship is restricted to students enrolled in the certificate program or CHAPS Master's program.

 

PLANNING RURAL DECLINE: MAPPING THE BUFFALO COMMONS (34:970:511:06, Index: 58025)

Popper (Wednesday, 1:10-3:50, Civic Square Building, 168)

Think smart growthis kind of dumb? New urbanism is a bit old? Had it with Eastern luxury items like affordable housing, eminent domain and form-based zoning?

Then take a course on one of the few planning ideas actually gaining on-the-ground momentum in the 21st century. Learn about wide open spaces with clean air, great vistas and old-school American values: places light on investment bankers, gentrifiers, and federal bureaucrats. Get acquainted with folks who don't talk, dress, eat or vote the way you do. Find out about people who are putting a high-end planning concept into practical, detailed effect. Delve into an idea that real politicians, financial heavyweights, landowners and everyday citizens know about, talk about and respect so that you don't once again have to explain it to the suckers from scratch. And while you're at it, do your part to change the national future.

Specifics: The studio focuses on the depopulating rural Great Plains as a region. It begins with the instructor and his wife's idea of the Buffalo Commons a a plausible future for much of the Plains. It then maps likely Buffalo Commons places, at both Plainswide and state-by-state scales. GIS background helpful, but not required.

 

STUDIES IN CHAPS: Archeology and Historic Preservation (593, Index: 51282)

Burrow, (Monday 4:30-7:30, VH 001)

Archeological and cultural resources are sometimes seen as a "special case" in historic preservation: somewhat removed from the conservation, restoration and management of historic buildings, districts and landscapes that are usually perceived as the main business of historic preservation. This course will introduce students to the discipline of archeology within historic preservation: the framework in which the majority of archeologists work today. It will show that archeology is an important partner discipline in effort to understand and protect the past. No previous knowledge of archology is assumed, and the course will commence with a basic introduction to archeological theory, methods and terminology. The national, state, and local regulatory and legal environment specifically impacting archeology will be reviewed. Using case studies, many of them regional, the many different roles of archeology inhistoric preservation will be explored.

STUDIES IN CHAPS: Heritage in the Public Sphere (594, Index: 54875)

Daniels (Wednesday 4:30-7:30, VH 001)

This course discusses how heritage is put to use in the wider public sphere. Whether designed for consumption at a tourist destination, displayed in a museum, or produced to inform good public policy, cultural heritage has become increasingly valuable to an informed and educated civil society. But it would be well to ask: what does it mean to produce cultural and historical knowledge for dissemination outside of an academic setting? How should it be done? For whom? Over the course of the semester, students will engage with readings that discuss how heritage is communicated to the public, the relationship between the academy and public policy, and the career paths available in heritage tourism, museums, government, and other cultural institutions. Our weekly discussions will explore the ways that heritage can serve the public good but also the kinds of debates and problems that arise in the process.

ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHAPS: Re/claiming the Past: Communities, Material Culture, and Cultural Heritage (603)

Woodhouse-Beyer, (Tuesdays 4:30-7:30, VH 001)

This course explores the diverse ways in which cultures and communities have utilized, and reclaimed the past by using archaeology and material culture (architecture, artifacts, and art) to position themselves, both socially and politically, within the modern world. Drawing from readings and research from the fields of archaeology and cultural heritage, class topics will include cultural heritage, authenticity, and invented traditions; nationalism and the mis/uses of archaeology; collections and collecting in the era of colonialism; public/community archaeology at sties of U.S. national importance; imagined and re/created communities; historic preservation of traditional (as well as intangible) cultural properties, and the growing efforts of modern indigenous communities to re-frame and reclaim their own history and space in the post-colonial era through the use of archaeology and display of museum collections. Case studies to be discussed include those of Nazi Germany, Plymouth Plantation, African American archaeology, New Zealand Maoritanga, Jamestown/Williamsburg, Utopian communities (Shakers, Oneida), Inuit and Australian Aboriginal art, Israeli archaeology, Native American archeological programs and museums, and the request for the return of cultural treasures (Elgin Marbles, Egyptian archaeology, Maori trophy heads, NAGPRA legislation).

ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY (607, Index: 54777)

Supervised internship or field study at an approved institution or site. Internships are arranged in the student's area of focus in consultation with the advisor. Required contact hours are a minimum of 80 for 3 credits. Grading will be based upon a final research paper or field report, in a format agreed upon with the advisor, and an evaluation submitted by the host institution.

RESEARCH IN CULTURAL HERITAGE (708, Index: 57676)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Requirements and Grading: Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

2010

Fall 2010

CORE COURSE

GLOBAL CULTURAL HERITAGE (16:082:530, Index: 13867)

Prof. Harvey (Wed 1:00 – 3:40, VH001)

The goal of this seminar is to examine current threats to cultural property worldwide, and to assess international and national initiatives being taken to protect our global cultural heritage. Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market.

Issues we will examine include: Who Owns the Past?; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting; Restitution-WW II and beyond; Cultural Tourism-the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management and Protection; Philosophy and Practice in Conservation and Preservation.

This is an interdisciplinary graduate seminar. Qualified graduate students from other disciplines are welcome to apply. Limit 15 students.

________________________________________

ELECTIVES

INTERNSHIP CULTURAL HERITAGE/HISTORIC PRESERVATION (16:082:590, Index: 06546)

by Arrangement – Special permission required

STUDIES IN CHAPS: CULTURE, PRESERVATION, AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST (16:082:593, Index: 13864)

Prof. Kahlaoui (Wed 4:30 – 7:30, VH001)

The Middle East is one of the richest archeological regions in the world. Yet, ironically, military conflicts aimed at establishing stability in the area have contributed to the deterioration of cultural artifacts and sites at an alarming rate. Military action, political indifference, and a vacuum of knowledge – linguistic, artistic, political, and cultural – have endangered the possibilities for preserving the essence of Middle Eastern art and archaeology and the roots of western European tradition. This course is about war and cultural heritage, politics and preservation as the new realities of our future. This course begins with a review of similar situations of war and art, from Napoleon to World War II and Vietnam ("we had to destroy it in order to save it"). Our work then moves quickly to a discussion of Middle Eastern art and archaeology, including the sack of the Iraq museum in Baghdad and the looting of sites in the countryside throughout the region. Half of the course is devoted to understanding both the art and archaeology of the region, and the other half is devoted to tracing their fate and their future under the challenge of present circumstances. This course will answer two questions. The first is: what do we need to know about the art history of Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Afghanistan? The second is: what are the threats to its survival for future generations? The course targets art history and CHAPS students. It will emphasize both visual approaches and preservation practices, and their relation to the respective social environments. Requirements will include informal discussion of common readings, oral reports on specific issues, and a 15-page research paper.

STUDIES IN CHAPS: Architectural Conservation: A Sustainable Approach (16:082:594, Index: 16311)

Prof. Hewitt (Wed. 9:50-12:50, ZAM-EDR)

This course is an introduction to what we generally call architectural preservation, accounting for the history of the field over the centuries, the theories that have guided the development of the field, and the directions that conservation takes in current practice. Serious attention will be given to a sustainable approach to architecture, in keeping with economic, social, and practical requirements of contemporary life. The course material will consist of readings, discussion, lecture, and some site visits if they can be accommodated by the instructor. The textbook will be John Stubbs, "Time Honored: A Global View of Architectural Conservation," 2009. The instructor is the author of three scholarly books on the American country house, the architecture of Carrere and Hastings, and Gustave Stickley‘s Craftsman Farms, and many other publications. He is an architect with a busy practice that includes original designs and preservation projects.

ADVANCED TOPICS CHAPS: Law, Public Policy and Ethics of Cultural Heritage Preservation (16:082:603, Index: 13865)

Prof. Jacob (Tues 4:30-7:30, VH001)

The first section of this course is designed to acquaint graduate students with laws applicable to art in general, such as legal rights of artists, legal status of museums as institutions and fiduciary obligations of museum trustees, legal obligations of dealers, auction houses and art merchants, and rights of private parties as owners of art. Art management and museum work are replete with these everyday issues. The second section of the course will center on consideration of cultural property in wartime embodied in the Holocaust Survivors Act, the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property and its implementing United States legislation, and national patrimony laws. These have shifted the focus of cultural heritage preservation, creating a new area of study reflected in case law, which borrows from concepts studied in the first section of the course. The third section of the course will deal with legal responses within the United States arising out of concerns of cultural heritage, such as the Native Americans Graves Repatriation Act, and national and local historic preservation laws. The course will consider both the difficulty of promulgating uniform ethical codes, and the problems of translating public policy into viable, workable sets of legal standards. This course is designed for those pursuing a Master's Degree in Cultural Heritage Preservation, as well as those graduate students pursuing a Certificate in Museum Studies. A series of short papers on assigned topics, two quizzes, and a long paper of the student's choosing will be required.

CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (01:070:393 index 18604)

Katharine Woodhouse-Beyer (Wednesdays 7:15-10:05 PM, Hickman 210, Douglass/Cook Campus)

Cultural resource management (“CRM”) is an interdisciplinary and professional discipline whose practitioners utilize a combination of historical, architectural, and archaeological investigations in compliance with federal, state and local regulations requiring the identification, preservation, and/or mitigation of cultural resources. Cultural resource management specialists emerge at the front lines of negotiation between the past and the present as the U.S. government and its many communities must carefully balance a concern for the preservation of cultural resources alongside the growing need for construction, maintenance, and development projects. It has been estimated that over half of the archaeologists within the U.S. work within CRM and that over 90% of the archaeological investigations conducted in the US are CRM projects. The course introduces students to the history and evolution of cultural resource management and legislation relating to archaeological resources in the U.S. from the early 20th century onwards, discusses methods of identifying and evaluating archaeological sites within a cultural resource management framework, provides guidance on basic skills of project planning, management, and client communications, and explores a wide variety of topical issues and case studies concerning the status of cultural resource management as a professional field wrestling with many of the cultural, social, and economic challenges of the 21st century.

________________________________________

707,708 Research in Cultural Heritage/Historic Preservation (BA,BA) Directed research by students composing master's theses.

 

Spring 2010

STUDIES IN CHAPS: Nationalism, Cosmopolitanism, and Contested Cultural Heritage

Brian Daniels

This course examines how nationalism and cosmopolitanism frame debates about ownership, universalism, and the display of cultural heritage. Contemporary debates about cultural heritage are often divided into competing “national” or “cosmopolitan” perspectives. What do these terms mean? How are they employed? What are their political and ethical consequences? What import do they have upon the future of museums and collections? This seminar will give students the opportunity to understand how museum practitioners, art historians, anthropologists, and archaeologists have conceived of their professional and moral responsibilities to local constituencies, political structures, and universal ideals. Our aim is to understand how ideas like “nationalism” and “cosmopolitanism” are related to each other, and the stakes they represent in a global debate that touches upon every dimension of museum policy and curation. Students will engage a series of critical readings that frame the contemporary arguments about the disposition of art, heritage, and cultural property. Seminar participants will have the opportunity to apply seminar discussions to their own area of interest and expertise.

________________________________________

STUDIES IN CHAPS: Studio in Preservation: The Cemetery at First Reformed Church, New Brunswick, New Jersey

Christine Miller Cruiess

This studio focuses on four major concepts: background research, writing historical narratives, inventory of significant elements in the cemetery, and a conditions assessment of the grave markers in the cemeteries. The goal of the course is to provide students with real-world experience in utilizing archives and local repositories for background research and writing background histories for sites and individuals. The students will research the design (including carvers/artists) and iconography of the grave markers in the cemetery. For the final focus area, lectures will focus on architectural conservation as it pertains to the materials found within the cemetery. Finally, the studio will culminate in the design and pilot implementation of a survey of the cemetery. The pilot survey will record current photography, art historical information, biographical information, conditions of grave markers, and treatment recommendations. The studio course will be followed by a summer field school open to students who have completed the studio.

________________________________________

STUDIES IN CHAPS: Native American Art, Cultural Heritage, and Cultural Preservation

Dr. Katharine Woodhouse-Beyer

This course employs an art historical and anthropological approach to the study of Native American visual art and the way in which indigenous material culture creatively, and actively, functions within the context of cultural heritage and cultural preservation. Coursework will include such topics as representations of and by Native Americans from the late 15th century to the modern time, the social, religious and political contexts of Native American art and visual culture in selected regions and critical points in history, the appropriation and commoditization of Native American art from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Native American artists of the 20th and 21st centuries, and the role of archaeology and visual art in cultural heritage preservation.

 

Summer 2010

Studio in Historic Preservation: Cemetery at First Reformed Church, New Brunswick, New Jersey

Christine Miller Cruiess

The summer field school follows a studio course offered in the spring semester which focused on background research, historical narratives, inventory of significant elements of the cemetery, and a conditions assessment of the markers in the cemetery. The field school will be divided into two sections. The first will focus on a full-scale implementation of the survey of the cemetery and creating a database for the cemetery that incorporates the photography and data collected during the studio. The second will focus on a pilot program to implement sample treatment recommendations within the cemetery. The field school will fill internship/field study requirements for CHAPS students.

________________________________________

Preserving the Past for the Future: Athens 2010 and Beyond

Dr. Ann Brysbaert

The program is a partnership between Rutgers University's Art History Dept. & Study Abroad Program, and The International Center for Hellenic & Mediterranen Studies (DIKEMES), Athens. All students will pursue a common curriculum of modules on core content themes (e.g., “Excavating the Athens Subway & Historic Preservation,” “The Parthenon Marbles & the New Acropolis Museum,” “Rebuilding the Neoclassical,” “Coping with Earthquake Damage on Byzantine Monuments in Thessaloniki,” “Preserving and Reusing the Ottoman Architectural Legacy,” “Identifying and Preserving Underwater Heritage,” “The Tourist Economy & Archaeology,” etc.). Top local experts and professionals will provide instruction and workshops connected with the modules. Graduate students will pursue additional internships or field study opportunities in museums, workshops, and other suitable sites, affording them first-hand experience of how Greek professionals in cultural heritage preservation approach their challenges and objectives.

2012

Undergraduate Courses - Spring 2012

CORE COURSE

Historic Preservation, 10:762:448, Index #67382

Listokin and Listokin (Thursday 6:10-8:40 pm, Civic Square Building 261)

The scope of historic preservation has expanded significantly. An overview of historical evolution of the preservation movement in the United States, examining important public preservation regulations and programs and the economics of historic preservation.

- OR -

II. Development/Preservation of Large Cities, 10:762:496:01, Index #75347

David Listokin (Monday, 9:50-12:30, Civic Square Building 261)

Students who have already had a course in American Architecture should register for Course II.

The class will electronically link (via Skype/other means) Rutgers University in New Jersey and the school of Architecture at the Second University of Naples (SUN) and the Region Centre for Cultural Heritage, Ecology and Economy (BENECON). The class will be taught in parallel by David Listokin (Rutgers) and faculty from SUN and BENECON.

This class will consider the subject of development and preservation in large cities (and other places) and will examine this interaction from an international perspective, considering case studies in the United States (with an emphasis on New York City) and Italy (with discussion of Naples and Pompeii). New York City has some of the leading cases in the United States of development triumphing over preservation (e.g., demolition of Penn Central Station) as well as opposite situations (e.g., preservation of Grand Central Station). The same is true in Italy, including Naples and Pompeii.

CHAPS ELECTIVES

01.082.492, Studies in CHAPS, Index# 75604

(Also available to graduate students for graduate credit)

9:50am-12:50pm, VH001, Harvey

Nature, Monuments, and Cultures/ World Heritage and the 21st Century

Focusing on World Heritage Sites, this seminar examines the intersection of nature and culture, analyzing the different roles of human influence in shaping the monuments, sites and landscapes that have been recognized as “of universal value” through nomination to UNESCO’s World Heritage List. How are these sites chosen? How do we define terms such as universal value, integrity, and authenticity, all prerequisites for listing? What are the consequences of being listed? How can such sites be managed and sustained in the face of the challenges of dramatically increased tourism, climate change, encroaching development and population growth, ethnic conflict and war. How do we engage and preserve the cultural links of people to place? Students will pursue reading on all of these issues and conduct research on a particular site or theoretical issue associated with World Heritage. Active participation in discussion and a willingness to engage the issues as a collaborative effort rather that up-down teacher/student process are expected. Requirements include short reports on reading and a research paper (ca. 15 pages) to be presented as a final oral report.

01:082:441, Studies in CHAPS, Index #72346

Tuesday, 4:30-7:30, VH001, Urban

Prerequisite: open to undergrads who have taken the Seminar in Global Heritage Preservation or with instructor permission.

Curating Guantánamo: Public History and Public Awareness

This course is both an introduction to public history and an examination into the contentious history of the U.S. naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. It provides an upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level introduction to the theory, methods, practice, and politics of public history, and allows students to explore the possibilities and challenges of the production and dissemination of histories in nonacademic settings. Students’ work will be part of a collaboration involving universities and colleges across the United States, organized by the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience’s Guantánamo Public Memory Project (http://www.sitesofconscience.org/activities/guantanamo-public-memory-project).

01:082:442, Studies in CHAPS, Index #71153

Monday, 1:10-4:10, VH001, Kahlaoui

Culture, Preservation, and Politics in the Middle East

The Middle East is one of the richest archeological regions in the world. Yet, ironically, military conflicts aimed at establishing stability in the area have contributed to the deterioration of cultural artifacts and sites at an alarming rate. Military action, political indifference, and a vacuum of knowledge – linguistic, artistic, political, and cultural – have endangered the possibilities for preserving the essence of Middle Eastern art and archaeology and the roots of western European tradition. This course is about war and cultural heritage, politics and preservation as the new realities of our future. This course begins with a review of similar situations of war and art, from napoleon to World War II and Vietnam ("we had to destroy it in order to save it"). Our work then moves quickly to a discussion of Middle Eastern art and archaeology, including the sack of the Iraq museum in Baghdad and the looting of sites in the countryside throughout the region. Half of the course is devoted to understanding both the art and archaeology of the region, and the other half is devoted to tracing their fate and their future under the challenge of present circumstances. This course will answer two questions. The first is: what do we need to know about the art history of Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Afghanistan? The second is: what are the threats to its survival for future generations? The course targets art history and CHAPS students. It will emphasize both visual approaches and preservation practices, and their relation to the respective social environments. Requirements will include informal discussion of common readings, oral reports on specific issues, and a 15-page research paper.

01:082:444, Studies in Architectural Preservation, index #75611

Wednesday, 4:30-7:30, VH001, Mills

Architectural Preservation: Philosophy and Practice

The course will explore the fundamentals of architectural preservation through a coordinated program of class discussion, fieldwork, documentation, and case studies. Students will study the sources, methods, and standards that inform preservation practice, and will apply the knowledge gained to real world situations. Working individually and in groups, students will gain familiarity with the range of architectural styles, materials, and construction methods that comprise our physical heritage. Case studies and visits to construction sites will illuminate the preservation issues and approaches that are inherent in preservation projects in New Jersey and other parts of the world. New Brunswick’s local neighborhoods and the Rutgers campus will serve as a laboratory for acquiring skills in the assessment of historic structures. Course discussion will tie these issues and methods to broader, global preservation issues. Course requirements include attendance at each scheduled classes , and grades will be assigned based upon a student's attendance and class participation, as well as on the completion of two short papers, a mid-term quiz, and the presentation of a term project. The short papers may serve as components to the term project at the student's discretion, and may assist in its completion. Students will present their work in class or at historic sites on the Rutgers campus. Field trips to preservation projects will be made where possible and appropriate.

01:082:448, Internship Cultural Heritage/Historic Preservation, Index #66542

By Arrangment - special permission required.

ELECTIVE COURSES OFFERED IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

AMERICAN STUDIES

01:050:308 Culture of Metropolis

Index #75375, T 7:15-10:05pm, ARH-200, Ferguson

ANTHROPOLOGY

01:070:105 Intro to Archaeology

Index #63943, Th 9:15-10:35am, Bio-206 and MW 3:55-5:15pm, HSB-201

Index #68355, Th 10:55-12:15pm, Bio-206 and MW 3:55-5:15pm, HSB-201

Index #68356, Th 2:15-3:35pm, Bio-206 and MW 3:55-5:15pm, HSB-201

ART HISTORY

01:082:355. French Architecture, 1515-1750

(CAC, TTH4, 1:10-2:30pm, ZAM MPR, Marder, Prerequisites: 01:082:105 & 106 or permission of instructor, Index 75606)

Principle developments in French architecture from the time of Francis I (1515-1547) to the reign of Napoleon I. Formal and theoretical developments, individual architects, urban planning, gardens, military architecture, classicism and the Orders, use and function in architecture, great cities, individual monuments.   Course requirements for French Architecture: 1. Class attendance, 2. Two three-page papers, 3. Midterm exam, and 4. Final exam.

01:082:368. Modern American Art

(CAC, MTH3, 11:30am-12:50pm, MU301, Watson, Prerequisite: 01:082:105 and 106 or permission of instructor, Index 76398)

MODERN NORTH AMERICAN VISUAL CULTURE

This course examines the history of North American visual culture from 1876 to the present with an eye toward the creation of visual ?modernity? in North America. We will look at material from both ?art? and ?non-art? contexts and consider its relationship to the fluid social and intellectual formations of modern life. Of special concern are the many social relationships created between the diverse viewers and artists of North America through visual culture. Taking a postcolonial approach, we will examine the way American nationality is constructed through power relationships based on assumptions about race, indigenous rights, and cultural progress. We will explore how the meaning of the nation continues to change across time and space, in dialogue with other forms of local and transnational community that are increasingly globally networked. Course requirements include: three concise essays, midterm and final exams, and class discussion.

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES

11:372:231 Fundamentals of Environmental Planning

Index #60902, MTH 12:35-1:55pm, CDL-102, Tulloch

Principles of environmental planning related to the planning process. Special emphasis on natural principles, policy issues, and social concerns impacting land use outcomes.

GEOGRAPHY

01:450:205 World Cultural Regions

Index #69265, MTH 12:00-1:20pm, BE-253, Bayouth

In this course, we will examine the cultural, environmental, political and socio-economic dimensions of our world, with an emphasis on Africa, Asia and Europe. Organized around the concept of regions, we will observe distinct human activities and physical processes taking place within each, with a special focus on broad themes of environmental change, globalization, economic development and regional diversity. The goal of the course is to let you develop a sense of place and space for each region at the local, national and global scales.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

11:550:330 History of Landscape Architecture

Index #77600, TF 10:55-12:15pm, RAB-204, Goto

This course provides an introduction to the history of landscape architecture around the world, beginning with the Paradise Gardens in Persia and concluding with the design of public parks in North America. The objective of this course is not only to provide an overview of various styles of gardens throughout the ages but also to give students a basic understanding of history as a methodological tool for the conceptualization and design of modern and contemporary landscape. Discussions on social and cultural influences on landscape architecture as well as the philosophical underpinnings of landscape design will also be covered.

PLANNING AND PUBLIC POLICY

10:762:444, American Land Use Policy, Index #70448

Monday, 12:35-3:35, RAB018, Popper

Exploring the diverse connections between America's national development and its land environment. This is essentially a course in ecological history.

 

Fall 2012 Graduate Courses

Global Cultural Heritage 16:082:530 Index: 10930

Prof. Harvey (Monday 1:00 – 3:40 VH001)

Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market. The goal of this seminar is to examine current threats to cultural property worldwide and to assess international and national initiatives to protect our global cultural heritage.

Issues we will examine include:

Who Owns the Past?; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management and Protection; UNESCO and World Heritage; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting; the Role and Purpose of Museums; Restitution-WW II and beyond; Cultural Tourism;; Philosophy and Practice in Conservation and Preservation. Requirements: Short oral reports on reading; Research paper and oral report.

This is an interdisciplinary graduate seminar. Qualified graduate students from other disciplines are welcome to apply. Limit 15 students

Studies in CHAPS: Architectural Conservation: A Sustainable Approach 16:082:594 Index: 11718

Hewitt (Wednesday 9:50 - 12:50 VH001)

This course is an introduction to what we generally call architectural preservation, accounting for the history of the field over the centuries, the theories that have guided the development of the field, and the directions that conservation takes in current practice. Serious attention will be given to a sustainable approach to architecture, in keeping with economic, social, and practical requirements of contemporary life. The course material will consist of readings, discussion, lecture, and some site visits if they can be accommodated by the instructor. The textbook will be John Stubbs, "Time Honored: A Global View of Architectural Conservation," 2009. The instructor is the author of three scholarly books on the American country house, the architecture of Carrere and Hastings, and Gustave Stickley‘s Craftsman Farms, and many other publications. He is an architect with a busy practice that includes original designs and preservation projects.

Advanced Topics CHAPS: Cemeteries, Monuments, and Memorials: Cultural Heritage and Remembering the Dead 16:082:603 Index: 10929

Prof. Woodhouse-Beyer (Tuesday 4:30 - 7:30 VH001)

This cultural heritage course considers the history and material culture of the memory and memorialization of individuals, social groups, and historic events through time, cultures, and landscapes. Our course material will include local, national, and international case studies drawn from archaeology, history, cultural heritage literature, and the contemporary world. Why do we choose to remember/memorialize some individuals and events over others? What sites and spaces stay secular – and what sites and spaces become sacred ground? What sites and spaces are nationally significant – or internationally-significant? How do some sites associated with the dead and historic events become contested ground – and why? This course will require seminar participation and that you spend individual time visiting local sites/cemeteries/monuments and memorials during our course. A Saturday group trip to a noted landscape of memorialization will be organized – and optional.

 

Advanced Intern/Field Study CHAPS 16:082:607 Index: 12504

by Arrangement – Special permission required

Supervised internship or field study related to thesis research. Internships are arranged in the student's area of focus in consultation with the adviser. Required contact hours are a minimum of 80 for 3 credits. Grading will be based upon a research paper or thesis, in a format agreed upon with the adviser, and an evaluation submitted by the host institution.

Research Cultural Heritage CHAPS 16:082:707 Index: 12293

by Arrangement – Special permission required

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis. Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

ART HISTORY UNDERGRADUATE COUSE THAT CAN BE TAKEN FOR GRADUATE CREDIT:

The Modern City: Eighty Years of Modern Architecture and Urbanism in New York, 1932 - 2012

16:082:428 Index: 16387

Bzdak (CAC, Wednesday 4:30 - 7:30 VH001)

This course will present an overview of the development of modern architecture and urbanism in New York from 1932, the year of MoMA’s seminal International Style exhibition, to the present. Topics will include the global prominence of the city by mid-century and the development of the United Nations Headquarters; large-scale residential planning; the impact of the Landmarks Preservation Commission Law of 1965; the growth of the city as part of a regional metropolis; and the rise, fall, and rebirth of the World Trade Center site. Topics of study will require students to visit the city, with opportunities for attending lectures and/or exhibitions. Several writing assignments, a midterm exam, and oral presentation will be required.

ELECTIVE COURSES OFFERED IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Rutgers-Newark

26:510:565 Public History: Presenting the Past: Public Histories of

Slavery for the Twenty-First Century

Lyra Monteiro (Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 pm)

This course explores the various ways in which the history of African enslavement in the New World has been remembered and interpreted in contexts ranging from historic sites and museum exhibitions to children’s literature and film, as we build towards developing proposals for new public interpretations of the history of slavery. We will use the history of African enslavement in the New World—a history that touches all of Western Europe, Western and Southern Africa, and the Americas—as a lens into the ways in which different countries and regions have publicly remembered a difficult past. Some of the issues we will explore in this class include: how the method, time, and place in which the past is narrated affect the story that can be told; the tensions between histories created for different kinds of audinces, including locals, tourists, and various descendant communities; and the ways in which the narration of slavery’s history changes over time—a topic that is particularly relevant now, as we mark the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, with an African American in the White House.

In order to address this topic, we will focus on the “primary documents” of public memory, including specific monuments, exhibitions, blogs, and plays. We will supplement this study with readings from the growing body of scholarship on the public history and public memory of slavery, coming out of disciplines including History, Archaeology, Sociology, and American Studies. As a final project, students will develop and present grant proposals for new public interpretations of the history and legacy of slavery, in a venue of their choice.

 

Graduate Courses - Spring 2012


CORE COURSE

Historic Preservation, 34:970:521, Index #67390

Listokin and Listokin (Thursday 6:10-8:40 pm, Civic Square Building 261)

The scope of historic preservation has expanded significantly. An overview of historical evolution of the preservation movement in the United States, examining important public preservation regulations and programs and the economics of historic preservation.

- OR -

Development/Preservation of Large Cities, 34:970:663:01, Index #75347

David Listokin (Monday, 9:50-12:30, Civic Square Building 261)

Students who have already had a course in American Architecture should register for Course II.

The class will electronically link (via Skype/other means) Rutgers University in New Jersey and the school of Architecture at the Second University of Naples (SUN) and the Region Centre for Cultural Heritage, Ecology and Economy (BENECON). The class will be taught in parallel by David Listokin (Rutgers) and faculty from SUN and BENECON.

This class will consider the subject of development and preservation in large cities (and other places) and will examine this interaction from an international perspective, considering case studies in the United States (with an emphasis on New York City) and Italy (with discussion of Naples and Pompeii). New York City has some of the leading cases in the United States of development triumphing over preservation (e.g., demolition of Penn Central Station) as well as opposite situations (e.g., preservation of Grand Central Station). The same is true in Italy, including Naples and Pompeii.

________________________________________

ELECTIVES

Studies in CHAPS, 01.082.492, Index# 75604

(Also available to graduate students for graduate credit)

9:50am-12:50pm, VH001, Harvey

Nature, Monuments, and Cultures/ World Heritage and the 21st Century

Focusing on World Heritage Sites, this seminar examines the intersection of nature and culture, analyzing the different roles of human influence in shaping the monuments, sites and landscapes that have been recognized as “of universal value” through nomination to UNESCO’s World Heritage List. How are these sites chosen? How do we define terms such as universal value, integrity, and authenticity, all prerequisites for listing? What are the consequences of being listed? How can such sites be managed and sustained in the face of the challenges of dramatically increased tourism, climate change, encroaching development and population growth, ethnic conflict and war. How do we engage and preserve the cultural links of people to place? Students will pursue reading on all of these issues and conduct research on a particular site or theoretical issue associated with World Heritage. Active participation in discussion and a willingness to engage the issues as a collaborative effort rather that up-down teacher/student process are expected. Requirements include short reports on reading and a research paper (ca. 15 pages) to be presented as a final oral report.

 

Studies in CHAPS, 16:082:593, Index #70237

Tuesday, 4:30-7:30, VH001, Urban

Curating Guantánamo: Public History and Public Awareness

This course is both an introduction to public history and an examination into the contentious history of the U.S. naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. It provides an upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level introduction to the theory, methods, practice, and politics of public history, and allows students to explore the possibilities and challenges of the production and dissemination of histories in nonacademic settings. Students’ work will be part of a collaboration involving universities and colleges across the United States, organized by the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience’s Guantánamo Public Memory Project (http://www.sitesofconscience.org/activities/guantanamo-public-memory-project).

Studies in CHAPS, 16:082:594, Index #72347

Monday, 1:10-4:10, VH001, Kahlaoui

Culture, Preservation, and Politics in the Middle East

The Middle East is one of the richest archeological regions in the world. Yet, ironically, military conflicts aimed at establishing stability in the area have contributed to the deterioration of cultural artifacts and sites at an alarming rate. Military action, political indifference, and a vacuum of knowledge – linguistic, artistic, political, and cultural – have endangered the possibilities for preserving the essence of Middle Eastern art and archaeology and the roots of western European tradition. This course is about war and cultural heritage, politics and preservation as the new realities of our future. This course begins with a review of similar situations of war and art, from napoleon to World War II and Vietnam ("we had to destroy it in order to save it"). Our work then moves quickly to a discussion of Middle Eastern art and archaeology, including the sack of the Iraq museum in Baghdad and the looting of sites in the countryside throughout the region. Half of the course is devoted to understanding both the art and archaeology of the region, and the other half is devoted to tracing their fate and their future under the challenge of present circumstances. This course will answer two questions. The first is: what do we need to know about the art history of Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Afghanistan? The second is: what are the threats to its survival for future generations? The course targets art history and CHAPS students. It will emphasize both visual approaches and preservation practices, and their relation to the respective social environments. Requirements will include informal discussion of common readings, oral reports on specific issues, and a 15-page research paper.

Advanced Topics in CHAPS, 16:082:603, index #72349

Wednesday, 4:30-7:30, VH001, Mills

Architectural Preservation: Philosophy and Practice

The course will explore the fundamentals of architectural preservation through a coordinated program of class discussion, fieldwork, documentation, and case studies. Students will study the sources, methods, and standards that inform preservation practice, and will apply the knowledge gained to real world situations. Working individually and in groups, students will gain familiarity with the range of architectural styles, materials, and construction methods that comprise our physical heritage. Case studies and visits to construction sites will illuminate the preservation issues and approaches that are inherent in preservation projects in New Jersey and other parts of the world. New Brunswick’s local neighborhoods and the Rutgers campus will serve as a laboratory for acquiring skills in the assessment of historic structures. Course discussion will tie these issues and methods to broader, global preservation issues. Course requirements include attendance at each scheduled classes , and grades will be assigned based upon a student's attendance and class participation, as well as on the completion of two short papers, a mid-term quiz, and the presentation of a term project. The short papers may serve as components to the term project at the student's discretion, and may assist in its completion. Students will present their work in class or at historic sites on the Rutgers campus. Field trips to preservation projects will be made where possible and appropriate.

Problems in Modern Art, 16:082:657, Index #75619

Thursday, 9:50-12:30, VH001, Yanni & Koven

The City in Britain: A Cultural History

Seth Koven, History, Carla Yanni, Art History

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar, co-taught by an historian and an architectural historian, will explore the city in British history, art, architecture, visual culture, and literature in the 19th and 20th centuries. We approach the city as a built space, as a crucible for the formation of social subjectivities and identities. The city’s history is here broadly conceived to include the entire built environment, from the grand gestures of urban planners to the alleys of the East End; we will study reform attempts, slum clearance, the settlement movement, and model housing. The gendered experience of the city will also be examined. While the focus will be on London, the course will cover other British cities as well, especially as related to the vast social and physical changes wrought by industry and imperialism. Together we will read accounts of the city as it was recorded by tourists, prostitutes, social reformers, architecture critics, aristocrats, and match girls. Emphasis will be placed on using visual sources as historical evidence (popular illustrations, maps, vintage photographs, buildings, urban plans, etc.)

Supported by a Mellon grant to the Rutgers British Studies Center, the seminar will offer students educational opportunities such as visits from eminent scholars from the UK, as well as a one-day conference called The Concrete City: Brutalism and Preservation.

The class will be conducted as a seminar, with requirements including an in-class presentation with images and a fifteen- to twenty-page research paper. It will be open to students from History, Art History, Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies, and other disciplines.

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By Arrangement - special permission required.

Directed research by students composing master's theses

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CHAPS
Department of Art History
Voorhees Hall
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New Brunswick, NJ 08901
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Fax 732.932.1261