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Spring 2015 Undergraduate Courses

CORE COURSE

Historic Preservation, 10:762:448, Index #06074

David Listokin (Thursday 6:10-8:40 pm, Civic Square Building 261)

The scope of historic preservation has expanded significantly. An overview of historical evolution of the preservation movement in the United States, examining important public preservation regulations and programs and the economics of historic preservation.

- OR -

II. International

David Listokin (Monday, 9:50-12:30, Civic Square Building 170)

This class will consider the subject of development and preservation in large cities (and other places) and will examine this interaction from an international perspective.

CHAPS ELECTIVES

WORLD HERITAGE IN PERIL: GLOBAL CHALLENGES AND NEW DIRECTIONS

(CAC, M, 1:00-3:40pm, VH001, Harvey, Section: 01, Index 09290)  

There are no prerequisites in Art History required for this course.        

The 21st century began inauspiciously with the destruction of Afghanistan’s Bamiyan Buddhas in one afternoon by cannon fire and explosives. Today, many of our most sacred and ancient sites are threatened by irreversible loss and destruction endangered by multiple simultaneous man-made threats, ranging from development pressures, unsustainable tourism, insufficient management, looting, and war and conflict.

Simultaneous man-made threats to the world’s cultural heritage far exceed the combined threats of floods, earthquakes, and climate change. Of Syria’s six World Heritage sites, five have been irreversibly damaged or destroyed. In Iraq, over 1,200 square miles of major ancient Sumerian archaeological sites have been systematically looted since 2003, including the major sites of Larsa and Umma, which originate from the earliest periods of human settlement. Loss and destruction is the status quo for many of the most significant national treasures across the developing world.                                                                              

But massive looting and destruction has not been restricted to conflict zones or to the developing world. Looting of museums, archaeological sites and religious institutions to feed the art market remains endemic across the developed world. Hundreds of cultural monuments and archaeological sites worldwide face a future of development pressures, unsustainable tourism, insufficient management, in addition to looting, and war and conflict. Machu Picchu, Angkor and Petra are being overrun by mass tourism, with millions of people crawling over fragile archaeological ruins. How long can these irreplaceable ancient sites last?                  

Like endangered species, many archaeological and cultural heritage sites and the monuments and works of art and artifacts associated with them are on the verge of extinction. They are an irreplaceable and finite resource. In a world that is becoming increasingly homogenized, these treasures are unique and priceless cultural assets, providing a basis for national identity, scientific and historical research, sustainable tourism, and other economic development opportunities for future generations.

Once they are gone—they are gone forever.

Including sites as diverse as the Statue of Liberty and Mesa Verde in the United States, East Africa’s Serengeti, the Pyramids of Egypt, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, the Acropolis of Athens, the Baroque cathedrals of Latin America, and Israel’s Masada, World Heritage Sites provide a window into new approaches and conservation strategies as well as emerging 21st century threats to heritage preservation worldwide.

Since both the problems and their solutions transcend national borders, successful preservation at all levels is dependent upon international collaboration in developing conservation strategies. New approaches to heritage conservation recognize that their goal is the management of future change rather than simply the protection of the fabric of the past.

Students will pursue selected readings, films and videos and make considerable use of UNESCO’s World heritage website. Active participation in discussion and a willingness to engage the issues as a collaborative effort rather that up-down teacher/student process are expected. Requirements include short reports on reading and a research paper (ca. 15 pages) to be presented as a final oral report.

Goals:

1)To develop an understanding of UNESCO, World Heritage and global approaches to the conservation of the monuments, sites and landscapes that constitute our cultural heritage.

2)To identify the past and present differences between preservation approaches in the United States and UNESCO World Heritage.

3)To be able to articulate your own beliefs and approaches to cultural heritage conservation at national and international levels.

“Heritage is our legacy from the past, what we live with today, and what we pass on to future generations.” (UNESCO)

441.02 STUDIES IN CHAPS

(CAC, T, 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Daniels, Section: 02, Index 12810)

There are no prerequisites in Art History required for this course.

Cultural Heritage in Global Perspective

Description:

This seminar will explore the ideas surrounding the theories, discourses, and practices surrounding natural and cultural heritage. Heritage has become inscribed in the planning of urban and rural landscapes, designed as tourist destinations, and considered a universal good in global cosmopolitan society. But it would be well to ask: what kind of “nature” and “culture” has been labeled as heritage? What kind of organizations, economics, and politics are necessary to sustain it? How are these put in place? By whom? For whom? Over the course of the semester, students will engage with readings that discuss how cultural and natural heritage is communicated to the public and the relationship between academic critique and pragmatic social engagement. This seminar is further grounded by a partnership the U.S. Mission to UNESCO focused on the assessment of World Heritage Sites, and students will have the opportunity to learn from and participate in this project.

441:03 STUDIES IN CHAPS

Shifting Cities: Cultural Heritage and Community Organizing Workshop

(CAC, F 9:50-12:30, VH104, Anita Bakshi and Catherine Boland Erkkila, Index 19862)

There are no prerequisites in Art History required for this course.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In an increasingly globalized society, our cities have undergone drastic economic, political, geographic and cultural changes. In the United States, migration and changing demographics have contributed to expanding multi-layered cities. Shifting populations bring new or transformed meaning to urban neighborhoods and the role of heritage in the city forms an ever-changing and significant component of urban life. This workshop focuses on the role of cultural heritage within the urban environment and the methods used by community organizations to protect, promote and preserve the heritage of the city’s shifting populations. What are the contemporary challenges of working in cities with communities whose needs and desires are often competing? What role do these organizations play in the building and sustaining a sense of community? How do the efforts of these various groups intersect within the shared urban environment? Are these organizations necessary to promote and preserve heritage? The goal of the course is to move beyond theoretical discussions of urban heritage and engage directly with local community and heritage organizations.

This course is presented in conjunction with the CHAPS International Conference, Shifting Cities: Urban Heritage in the 21st Century, to be held in Fall 2015. Students will have the opportunity to present their work with local New Jersey organizations in a special conference session. Students from diverse disciplinary backgrounds are welcome.

NOTE: This is a fieldwork-based course, and will require some travel to site visits to nearby locations in New Jersey including: New Brunswick, Piscataway, Perth Amboy, and Trenton. Students are expected to organize travel arrangements through car-pooling. Some reimbursement may be available for fuel costs. Instructors will also attempt to secure university transportation if necessary.

COURSE FORMAT:

This course is set up as workshop that will allow students to gain practical experience working with different community organizations in the New Brunswick area. For the first few weeks we will meet in the classroom. We will build familiarity with how heritage organizations function at the local, national, and international levels through lectures and discussions of readings.

After this initial period, we will spend most of our time in the field, spending several weeks with the Latino Leadership Alliance of New Jersey, learning about their efforts to promote and preserve cultural heritage through their site in Perth Amboy: La Casa de la Educacion y Cultura Latina. This center is located at 339 Reade Street in Perth Amboy, and is approximately a 15-20 minute drive from the Rutgers New Brunswick campus. Organization leaders will speak to the class about their work and we will have the opportunity to meet with their constituents. As a group, we will work with organization leaders to suggest future programs and recommendations to further engage the local community.

In the final part of the course students will engage in individual on-site research with a local organization of their choice. We will reconvene in the classroom for student presentations of their own work and the goals, programs, and areas in which the organizations they studied can develop. Internship credit is possible if students choose to continue working with the organization during the summer.

 

442. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHAPS – CULTURAL HERITAGE AND DISASTERS: PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RESILIENCE

(CAC, W, 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, Section: 01, Index 08590)

There are no prerequisites in Art History required for this course.

In the past, and throughout the contemporary era, natural and cultural disasters of local, national, and international scale have challenged cultural heritage sites and communities around the world. This seminar course considers a variety of disaster events, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, warfare, and pandemics, and their effects on historic properties, archaeological sites, cultural landscapes, museum collections, communities, and cultures. Our seminar work will include discussion of global case studies; strategies and protocols for disaster preparedness and post-disaster response/ survey/ preservation; and critical review and assessment of national and international cultural heritage disaster management plans.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

After taking this course, students enrolled in Cultural Heritage and Disaster will be able to:

1. Understand the destructive effects of natural phenomena and cultural forces on cultural and historic properties, communities, and landscapes;

2. Consider and evaluate the roles of local, state, national, and international agencies and organizations in disaster management planning, response, and mitigation;

3. Acquire a broad knowledge of the methods of damage assessment and disaster management mitigation principles concerning historic properties, archaeological sites, and communities affected by natural disasters;

4. Discuss and critique national and international approaches to disaster management and mitigation through the evaluation of case studies.

Students are required to complete a range of graded assignments and exams distributed throughout the course: attendance/participation, 2 case presentations, a research paper, and midterm and final examinations.

447. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(Hours by arrangement, By permission of the CHAPS director, See department staff for special permission number Index 05470)

 

Spring 2015 Graduate Courses

CORE COURSE

________________________________________

521. Historic Preservation

34:970:521 Index: 06079

Listokin (Thursday 6:10-8:40 Civic Square Building 261)

The scope of historic preservation has expanded significantly. An overview of historical

evolution of the preservation movement in the United States, examining important public

preservation regulations and programs and the economics of historic preservation.

International Historic Preservation

34:970:522:01 Index: 13633

Listokin (Monday 9:50-12:30 Civic Square Building 170)

This class will consider the subject of development and preservation in large cities (and other places) and will examine this interaction from an international perspective.

CHAPS ELECTIVES

591. INTERNSHIP: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(By arrangement; Special permission required; Index 05485)

593. STUDIES IN CHAPS

(CAC, M 1:00-3:40, Harvey, Index 08022)

World Heritage in Peril: Global Challenges and New Directions

The 21st century began inauspiciously with the destruction of Afghanistan’s Bamiyan Buddhas in one afternoon by cannon fire and explosives. Today, many of our most sacred and ancient sites are threatened by irreversible loss and destruction endangered by multiple simultaneous man-made threats, ranging from development pressures, unsustainable tourism, insufficient management, looting, and war and conflict.

Simultaneous man-made threats to the world’s cultural heritage far exceed the combined threats of floods, earthquakes, and climate change. Of Syria’s six World Heritage sites, five have been irreversibly damaged or destroyed. In Iraq, over 1,200 square miles of major ancient Sumerian archaeological sites have been systematically looted since 2003, including the major sites of Larsa and Umma, which originate from the earliest periods of human settlement. Loss and destruction is the status quo for many of the most significant national treasures across the developing world.                                                                                  

But massive looting and destruction has not been restricted to conflict zones or to the developing world. Looting of museums, archaeological sites and religious institutions to feed the art market remains endemic across the developed world. Hundreds of cultural monuments and archaeological sites worldwide face a future of development pressures, unsustainable tourism, insufficient management, in addition to looting, and war and conflict. Machu Picchu, Angkor and Petra are being overrun by mass tourism, with millions of people crawling over fragile archaeological ruins. How long can these irreplaceable ancient sites last?                    

Like endangered species, many archaeological and cultural heritage sites and the monuments and works of art and artifacts associated with them are on the verge of extinction. They are an irreplaceable and finite resource. In a world that is becoming increasingly homogenized, these treasures are unique and priceless cultural assets, providing a basis for national identity, scientific and historical research, sustainable tourism, and other economic development opportunities for future generations.

Once they are gone—they are gone forever.

Including sites as diverse as the Statue of Liberty and Mesa Verde in the United States, East Africa’s Serengeti, the Pyramids of Egypt, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, the Acropolis of Athens, the Baroque cathedrals of Latin America, and Israel’s Masada, World Heritage Sites provide a window into new approaches and conservation strategies as well as emerging 21st century threats to heritage preservation worldwide.

Since both the problems and their solutions transcend national borders, successful preservation at all levels is dependent upon international collaboration in developing conservation strategies. New approaches to heritage conservation recognize that their goal is the management of future change rather than simply the protection of the fabric of the past.

Students will pursue selected readings, films and videos and make considerable use of UNESCO’s World heritage website. Active participation in discussion and a willingness to engage the issues as a collaborative effort rather that up-down teacher/student process are expected. Requirements include short reports on reading and a research paper (ca. 15 pages) to be presented as a final oral report.

Goals:

1) To develop an understanding of UNESCO, World Heritage and global approaches to the conservation of the monuments, sites and landscapes that constitute our cultural heritage.

2) To identify the past and present differences between preservation approaches in the United States and UNESCO World Heritage.

3) To be able to articulate your own beliefs and approaches to cultural heritage conservation at national and international levels.

“Heritage is our legacy from the past, what we live with today, and what we pass on to future generations.” (UNESCO)

594. STUDIES IN CHAPS

(CAC, T 4:30-7:30, Daniels, Index 09291)

Cultural Heritage in Global Perspective

Description:

This seminar will explore the ideas surrounding the theories, discourses, and practices surrounding natural and cultural heritage. Heritage has become inscribed in the planning of urban and rural landscapes, designed as tourist destinations, and considered a universal good in global cosmopolitan society. But it would be well to ask: what kind of “nature” and “culture” has been labeled as heritage? What kind of organizations, economics, and politics are necessary to sustain it? How are these put in place? By whom? For whom? Over the course of the semester, students will engage with readings that discuss how cultural and natural heritage is communicated to the public and the relationship between academic critique and pragmatic social engagement. This seminar is further grounded by a partnership the U.S. Mission to UNESCO focused on the assessment of World Heritage Sites, and students will have the opportunity to learn from and participate in this project.

 

593:02 STUDIES IN CHAPS

Shifting Cities: Cultural Heritage and Community Organizing Workshop

(CAC, F 9:50-12:30, VH104, Anita Bakshi and Catherine Boland Erkkila, Index 19861)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

In an increasingly globalized society, our cities have undergone drastic economic, political, geographic and cultural changes. In the United States, migration and changing demographics have contributed to expanding multi-layered cities. Shifting populations bring new or transformed meaning to urban neighborhoods and the role of heritage in the city forms an ever-changing and significant component of urban life. This workshop focuses on the role of cultural heritage within the urban environment and the methods used by community organizations to protect, promote and preserve the heritage of the city’s shifting populations. What are the contemporary challenges of working in cities with communities whose needs and desires are often competing? What role do these organizations play in the building and sustaining a sense of community? How do the efforts of these various groups intersect within the shared urban environment? Are these organizations necessary to promote and preserve heritage? The goal of the course is to move beyond theoretical discussions of urban heritage and engage directly with local community and heritage organizations.

This course is presented in conjunction with the CHAPS International Conference, Shifting Cities: Urban Heritage in the 21st Century, to be held in Fall 2015. Students will have the opportunity to present their work with local New Jersey organizations in a special conference session. Students from diverse disciplinary backgrounds are welcome.

NOTE: This is a fieldwork-based course, and will require some travel to site visits to nearby locations in New Jersey including: New Brunswick, Piscataway, Perth Amboy, and Trenton. Students are expected to organize travel arrangements through car-pooling. Some reimbursement may be available for fuel costs. Instructors will also attempt to secure university transportation if necessary.

COURSE FORMAT:

This course is set up as workshop that will allow students to gain practical experience working with different community organizations in the New Brunswick area. For the first few weeks we will meet in the classroom. We will build familiarity with how heritage organizations function at the local, national, and international levels through lectures and discussions of readings.

After this initial period, we will spend most of our time in the field, spending several weeks with the Latino Leadership Alliance of New Jersey, learning about their efforts to promote and preserve cultural heritage through their site in Perth Amboy: La Casa de la Educacion y Cultura Latina. This center is located at 339 Reade Street in Perth Amboy, and is approximately a 15-20 minute drive from the Rutgers New Brunswick campus. Organization leaders will speak to the class about their work and we will have the opportunity to meet with their constituents. As a group, we will work with organization leaders to suggest future programs and recommendations to further engage the local community.

In the final part of the course students will engage in individual on-site research with a local organization of their choice. We will reconvene in the classroom for student presentations of their own work and the goals, programs, and areas in which the organizations they studied can develop. Internship credit is possible if students choose to continue working with the organization during the summer.

603. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHAPS: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND DISASTERS: PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RESILIENCE

(CAC, W 4:30-7:30, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index 09292)

In the past, and throughout the contemporary era, natural and cultural disasters of local, national, and international scale have challenged cultural heritage sites and communities around the world. This seminar course considers a variety of disaster events, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, warfare, and pandemics, and their effects on historic properties, archaeological sites, cultural landscapes, museum collections, communities, and cultures. Our seminar work will include discussion of global case studies; strategies and protocols for disaster preparedness and post-disaster response/ survey/ preservation; and critical review and assessment of national and international cultural heritage disaster management plans.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

After taking this course, students enrolled in Cultural Heritage and Disaster will be able to:

1. Understand the destructive effects of natural phenomena and cultural forces on cultural and historic properties, communities, and landscapes;

2. Consider and evaluate the roles of local, state, national, and international agencies and organizations in disaster management planning, response, and mitigation;

3. Acquire a broad knowledge of the methods of damage assessment and disaster management mitigation principles concerning historic properties, archaeological sites, and communities affected by natural disasters;

4. Discuss and critique national and international approaches to disaster management and mitigation through the evaluation of case studies.

Students are required to complete a range of graded assignments and exams distributed throughout the course: attendance/participation, 2 case presentations, a research paper, and midterm and final examinations.

607. CHAPS ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 09264)

707. RESEARCH CULTURAL HERITAGE (CHAPS)

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 10043)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

 

Fall 2015 Undergraduate Courses

 

Archer
430. SEMINAR IN GLOBAL CULTURAL HERITAGE

(CAC, T 4:30-7:30, Art Library Seminar Room, Daniels, Index 05361)

The seminar is interdisciplinary in focus. Interested students from other departments/disciplines are welcome.

This seminar addresses crucial issues of conservation and preservation within the rapidly changing world of the 21st century Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market. This seminar examines these issues within the context of current preservation theory and practice.

Issues to be addressed include: Who Owns the Past?; UNESCO and World Heritage; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting (museums, collectors, dealers); The Destruction of Cultural Heritage during War or Ethnic Conflict; Looting and willful destruction of Historic Sites and Buildings; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management

Goals:

To define and identify current threats to the conservation of the monuments, sites, works of art and material culture that constitute our cultural heritage worldwide.

To assess international and national initiatives being taken to protect cultural heritage, both tangible and intangible.

To enable you to formulate, discuss, and defend your own values through critical analysis of the material covered and to become an effective advocate for the preservation of cultural heritage.

To raise awareness of a flourishing field of Cultural Heritage Preservation and career opportunities within the field

To encourage you to develop an international perspective that will enrich your future studies.

            .

Requirements:

Attendance:

Students are expected to attend all classes and to participate in class discussion. Throughout the semester, students will present brief reports on assigned readings or on topics to be researched on the Internet.

Reading:

Readings are available on Sakai. They are designed to introduce you to cultural heritage issues. In addition to the assigned reading, additional material will serve as a valuable resource for research topics. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with this material as it relates to their projects. The Internet, current newspapers, and periodicals are valuable resources that should be consulted regularly for research and to keep up to date on cultural property issues in general. There is a list of valuable Internet sites posted with the syllabus.

Quiz:

There will be a midterm quiz.

Paper:

There will be a research paper of approximately 10-12 pages.

Students registered for 082:430 should consult with the instructor to design a topic related to their particular focus within the Program in Art History and/or CHAPS.

Grading: 1/3 Attendance and participation in discussion based on readings.

               1/3 Quiz and mini presentations (Case studies and student reports)

               1/3 Research project, including paper and oral presentation

Public histories
441. TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Public Histories of Detention and Mass Incarceration

(C/D, Mondays, 12:35-3:35pm, RAB018, Urban, Index 07087)

  

This unique course will give students the opportunity to work on a collaborative public exhibition and series of digital projects, organized by the Humanities Action Lab, on the history of detention and mass incarceration in the United States. The resulting project will be seen by an audience of more than a half million visitors, and will be on display at locations across country – from Riverside, California to Nashville, Tennessee – as well as on Rutgers’ campus. Our specific contribution to the project will focus on the history of Seabrook Farms, a frozen foods processing facility and World War Two labor camp in southern New Jersey that housed Japanese American and Japanese Peruvian detainees. Upon completion, students’ research and curation will be incorporated into the national travelling exhibition. Complementing our work on the exhibit, the course will also examine more broadly the politics, economics, and social and cultural meanings of incarceration and detention – from the colonial era to the present – and the centrality of these practices to American history. Finally, this course will function as an advanced public history theory and methodology course. Using the Humanities Action Lab exhibition as a practical case study, we will address the possibilities and challenges that come with producing and disseminating histories outside of the classroom.

 

KWB
442. ADVANCED TOPICS CHAPS: Cemeteries, Monuments, and Memorials: Cultural Heritage and Remembering the Dead

(CAC, W6&7, 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index #13243)

This cultural heritage course explores the history and material culture of the memorialization of individuals, social groups, and historic events through time, cultures, and landscapes. Our course material will include local, national, and global case studies and examples drawn from the fields of cultural heritage, cultural resource management, historic preservation, archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, death studies, landscape architecture, and the contemporary world. Why and how do we choose to remember/memorialize some individuals and events over others? What does the form and design of cemeteries, monuments, and monuments reveal about communities, culture, politics, and cultural/historical memory? Which memorial sites and spaces stay secular – and which become sacred ground? How and when do acts of memorialization become vehicles for mediating and reinterpreting the past? How and why do some sites associated with the dead and historic events become contested ground while others are forgotten? What is the role and purpose of “dark tourism” and studies of “negative heritage” as part of remembering and forgetting in the contemporary world?

Graded course components: Attendance and participation; one article presentation/discussion (10-15 minutes); one 5-page paper based on own visit to cemetery, monument, or memorial; midterm exam; final exam; research paper.

 

Historic preservation
444. TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Architectural Conservation: A Sustainable Approach

(CAC, W23, 9:50am-12:50pm, VH104, Hewitt, Index 19923)

 

This course, co-listed for graduate as well as undergraduate students, presents an alternative view of architectural conservation based upon the new schema of sustainability. Since buildings cannot be separated from their ecological and historical context, it makes sense to view their continued life as a part of the biosphere. Lectures will cover the history of architectural conservation during the first half of the course, and explore new concepts in preservation during the second half. Requirements include two exams and a research paper.

 

Picture1
447. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(Hours by arrangement, By permission of the CHAPS director, See department staff for special permission number Index 05362)

 

Fall 2015 Graduate Courses

 

Archer
530. SEMINAR IN GLOBAL CULTURAL HERITAGE

(CAC, W 1:00-3:40, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index 08746)

This seminar addresses crucial issues of conservation and preservation within the rapidly changing world of the 21st century.

It is interdisciplinary in focus. Interested students from other disciplines are welcome.

Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market.  This seminar examines these issues within the context of current preservation theory and practice nationally and internationally. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in the planning and implementation of the CHAPS international conference Shifting Cities: Urban Heritage in the 21st Century, to take place in November.

Goals

To examine current threats to cultural heritage worldwide and to assess international and national initiatives to protect our global cultural heritage.

To become familiar with the global perspective on tangible and intangible heritage that increasingly informs preservation theory and practice in the 21st century.

To become aware of research and career opportunities within the field of Cultural Heritage Preservation that relate to your field of specialization.

Issues we will examine include:

Who Owns the Past?; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management and Protection;  UNESCO and World Heritage; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting; the Role and Purpose of Museums; Restitution-WW II and beyond; Cultural Tourism;; Philosophy and Practice in Conservation and Preservation. Requirements: Short oral reports on reading; Research paper and oral report.

Requirements:

Attendance:

This is a seminar. Students are expected to attend all classes and to participate in class discussion. Throughout the semester, students will present brief reports on assigned readings or on topics to be researched on the Internet.

Reading:

Readings are available on Sakai. In addition to the assigned reading, additional material will serve as a valuable resource for research topics.  The Internet, current newspapers, and periodicals are valuable resources that will be consulted regularly for research and to keep up to date on cultural property issues in general. A list of valuable Internet sites will be posted with the syllabus.

Research Paper:

There will be a research paper of approximately 12-15 pages.

Students registered for 082:530 should consult with the instructor to design a topic related to their particular focus within the Program in Art History, CHAPS or related fields.

Grading: 1/4 Attendance and participation in discussion based on readings.

                1/4 mini presentations (Case studies and student reports)

                1/2 Research project, including paper and oral presentation.

Picture1

590. INTERNSHIP: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(By arrangement; Special permission required; Index 04946)

Public histories

593. TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Public Histories of Detention and Mass Incarceration

(C/D, Mondays, 12:35-3:35pm, RAB018, Urban, Index 16828)

  

This unique course will give students the opportunity to work on a collaborative public exhibition and series of digital projects, organized by the Humanities Action Lab, on the history of detention and mass incarceration in the United States. The resulting project will be seen by an audience of more than a half million visitors, and will be on display at locations across country – from Riverside, California to Nashville, Tennessee – as well as on Rutgers’ campus. Our specific contribution to the project will focus on the history of Seabrook Farms, a frozen foods processing facility and World War Two labor camp in southern New Jersey that housed Japanese American and Japanese Peruvian detainees. Upon completion, students’ research and curation will be incorporated into the national travelling exhibition. Complementing our work on the exhibit, the course will also examine more broadly the politics, economics, and social and cultural meanings of incarceration and detention – from the colonial era to the present – and the centrality of these practices to American history. Finally, this course will function as an advanced public history theory and methodology course. Using the Humanities Action Lab exhibition as a practical case study, we will address the possibilities and challenges that come with producing and disseminating histories outside of the classroom.

 

Historic preservation
594. TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Architectural Conservation: A Sustainable Approach

(CAC, W23, 9:50am-12:50pm, VH104, Hewitt, Index 09262)

 

This course, co-listed for graduate as well as undergraduate students, presents an alternative view of architectural conservation based upon the new schema of sustainability. Since buildings cannot be separated from their ecological and historical context, it makes sense to view their continued life as a part of the biosphere. Lectures will cover the history of architectural conservation during the first half of the course, and explore new concepts in preservation during the second half. Requirements include two exams and a research paper.

KWB
603. ADVANCED TOPICS CHAPS: Cemeteries, Monuments, and Memorials: Cultural Heritage and Remembering the Dead

(CAC, W6&7, 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index #08745)

This cultural heritage course explores the history and material culture of the memorialization of individuals, social groups, and historic events through time, cultures, and landscapes. Our course material will include local, national, and global case studies and examples drawn from the fields of cultural heritage, cultural resource management, historic preservation, archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, death studies, landscape architecture, and the contemporary world. Why and how do we choose to remember/memorialize some individuals and events over others? What does the form and design of cemeteries, monuments, and monuments reveal about communities, culture, politics, and cultural/historical memory? Which memorial sites and spaces stay secular – and which become sacred ground? How and when do acts of memorialization become vehicles for mediating and reinterpreting the past? How and why do some sites associated with the dead and historic events become contested ground while others are forgotten? What is the role and purpose of “dark tourism” and studies of “negative heritage” as part of remembering and forgetting in the contemporary world?

Graded course components: Attendance and participation; one article presentation/discussion (10-15 minutes); one 5-page paper based on own visit to cemetery, monument, or memorial; midterm exam; final exam; research paper.

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607. CHAPS ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 09710)

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707. RESEARCH CULTURAL HERITAGE (CHAPS)

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 09572)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

CHAPS
Department of Art History
Voorhees Hall
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
  Phone 848.932.7041
Fax 732.932.1261