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Fall 2014 Undergraduate Courses

430. SEMINAR IN CULTURAL HERITAGE PRESERVATION:

(CAC, M6/7, 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Harvey, Index 05673)

The seminar is interdisciplinary in focus. Interested students from other departments/disciplines are welcome.

Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Syria, Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. Migration, changing demographics, shifting populations, global urbanization, and climate change are reshaping the cultural landscape of the 21st century, and bringing about dramatic changes in theoretical and practical approaches to preservation on national, international and local levels. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market. This seminar examines these issues within the context of current preservation theory and practice.

Issues to be addressed include: Who Owns the Past?; UNESCO and World Heritage; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting (museums, collectors, dealers); The Destruction of Cultural Heritage during War or Ethnic Conflict; Looting and willful destruction of Historic Sites and Buildings; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management

Goals:

To define and identify current threats to the conservation of the monuments, sites, works of art and material culture that constitute our cultural heritage worldwide.

To assess international and national initiatives being taken to protect cultural heritage, both tangible and intangible.

To enable you to formulate, discuss, and defend your own values through critical analysis of the material covered and to become an effective advocate for the preservation of cultural heritage.

To raise awareness of a flourishing field of Cultural Heritage Preservation and career opportunities within the field

To encourage you to develop an international perspective that will enrich your future studies.

           .

Requirements:

Attendance:

Students are expected to attend all classes and to participate in class discussion. Throughout the semester, students will present brief reports on assigned readings or on topics to be researched on the Internet.

Reading:

Readings are available on Sakai. They are designed to introduce you to cultural heritage issues. In addition to the assigned reading, additional material will serve as a valuable resource for research topics. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with this material as it relates to their projects. The Internet, current newspapers, and periodicals are valuable resources that should be consulted regularly for research and to keep up to date on cultural property issues in general. There is a list of valuable Internet sites posted with the syllabus.

Quiz:

There will be a midterm quiz.

Paper:

There will be a research paper of approximately 10-12 pages.

Students registered for 082:430 should consult with the instructor to design a topic related to their particular focus within the Program in Art History and/or CHAPS.

Grading: 1/3 Attendance and participation in discussion based on readings.

              1/3 Quiz and mini presentations (Case studies and student reports)

               1/3 Research project, including paper and oral presentation

441. TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Architectural Conservation: A Sustainable Approach

(CAC, W23, 9:50am-12:50pm, VH104, Hewitt, Index 07558)

This course, co-listed for graduate as well as undergraduate students, presents an alternative view of architectural conservation based upon the new schema of sustainability. Since buildings cannot be separated from their ecological and historical context, it makes sense to view their continued life as a part of the biosphere. Lectures will cover the history of architectural conservation during the first half of the course, and explore new concepts in preservation during the second half. Requirements include two exams and a research paper.

441. Section 02: TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Heritage, Planning, and Contested Spatial Practices in Divided Cities

(CAC, Thursdays, 1:00-3:40, VH001, Bakshi, Index 20689)

Course Objectives: This course will introduce students to a broad range of issues of relevance in contested or divided cities, including planning, heritage management, ‘coexistence’, memory, and myth. By the end of the course, students should have a general understanding of the many tools and vehicles through which contested places are reconfigured to serve political goals. It will be emphasized that this is accomplished not only through planning and material interventions, but also through administrative policies, commemorative practices, and imaginative and mythical reconstructions of the city.

Course Format: The course will be organized along four broad themes; The History of Division in Cities; Heritage, Commemoration, Representation; Planning and Spatial Practices; and Memory, History, and Myth. Classes will consist of lectures on the themes outlined below, allowing time for group discussion in each class.   Discussions will attempt to connect the material covered in the lectures with related contemporary issues in cities familiar to the students.

442. TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Cultural Resource Management and Global Cultural Heritage Preservation

(CAC, T6&7, 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index #14907)

Cultural resource management, at both national and international levels, is an interdisciplinary field which is, 1. conducted in compliance with environmental and historic preservation laws and, 2. concerned with the management of cultural resources, including archaeological sites, historic buildings and districts, cultural landscapes, heritage objects, and intangible heritage. This advanced undergraduate and graduate course considers the methodology and practice of cultural resource management at both national and international levels - as well as from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Issues to be addressed in this seminar course include: What is Cultural Resource Management and how is it guided and practiced in the U.S. as well as other nations?; What are cultural resources and why must they be managed?; Cultural Resource Management identification, evaluation and management methods in the U.S.; Cultural Resource Management business and ethics; Indigenous heritage, descendant communities, and the issue of control over cultural resources; Cultural landscapes and traditional cultural properties; Threats to international cultural heritage (war, natural disasters, looting); and Cultural Resource Management’s contribution to strategies for cultural heritage management and preservation.

Course Goals:

•             To understand the interdisciplinary nature and scope of Cultural Resource Management as a compliance-related field and practice;

•             To describe the methods and business of Cultural Resource Management as practiced by archaeologists, architectural historians, and site managers;

•             To compare how Cultural Resource Management is practiced nationally, internationally, and by indigenous peoples;

•             To assess how Cultural Resource Management organizations and operations work together at community, national, and international levels towards the preservation of cultural resources (both tangible and intangible) under threat from development, warfare, and natural disasters;

•             To foster a critical, global, and interdisciplinary perspective on Cultural Resource Management and its application to real world problems such as globalization, industrialization, and climate change.

Requirements:

Students are expected to attend all classes, to complete all class readings and assignments, and to participate in all class discussions. As this is primarily a seminar (though will also include “mini-lectures” by KWB), students will be assigned to present brief reports on assigned readings or on topics to be researched throughout the semester.

Work and assignments for this seminar course include one home assignment, regular short presentations on assigned readings, an in-class midterm, a research paper (12-15 pages for undergraduates, and 15-20 pages for graduate students,) an in-class presentation on research paper research; and a take-home exam.

447. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(Hours by arrangement, By permission of the CHAPS director, See department staff for special permission number Index 05674)


Other Art History courses that count as electives:

391. NINETEENTH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE IN THE UNITED STATES

(CAC, T2F2, 9:50-11:10am, MU301, Yanni, Index 14030, Prerequisite: 01:082:105, 106, or permission of instructor)

This course offers an overview of the social and intellectual history of architecture in what is now the United States from about 1750 to 1900. The lectures will analyze the role of architecture in societal transformations (the development of nationhood, industrialization, and urbanization.) In my own research, I look at the architecture of public institutions, like museums, insane asylums, and universities. In this class, you will notice an emphasis on the invention of new building types, including colleges, government buildings, prisons, hospitals, railroad stations, and World's Fairs. We will also study the novel building techniques and materials of the nineteenth century. Some of the classes will cover the work of well-known architects such as Frank Furness, Louis Sullivan, and Frank Lloyd Wright, but other classes will cover vernacular architecture.

Readings will be posted on Sakai. The lectures will be posted in Sakai shortly after I give them, not before.

This class counts as an elective in the historic preservation certificate program, but it is not a core course in the certificate program.

Expectations: Attendance is mandatory. Your grade will be based on attendance, participation, two tests, and one 8-page research paper. Memorization is not required for the tests. Additional projects (including a self-funded visit to a site in New York City) may be arranged, depending on student interest.

Requirements to get a high grade: As an educator, I place a high value on coming to class well-prepared and deeply motivated, and I expect the same from my students. I believe that in a successful college class, the professor and the students create a community of engaged scholars who explore an intellectual subject (in our case, architectural history) together. There are in-class assignments and projects that will require your attention. If you want to do well in this class, you will need to keep up with the readings, attend class, participate in a meaningful way, and take responsibility for your own education.

 

487. SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN ART: WORLD’S FAIRS AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITIONS, 1851-2015: STAGING INNOVATIONS IN ART, ARCHITECTURE, AND DESIGN

(CAC W7/8, 6:10-9:00pm, VH001, Bzdaks, Index 17308)

As Expo 2015 in Milan, Italy, (www.2015worldsfair.com) approaches, this course will provide students with a survey of world’s fairs and expos since the first world’s fair in 1851. Among the notable fairs forming the nucleus of this course are: the 1878 Exposition Universelle in Paris; the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago; the 1910 Exposition Universelle et Internationale in Brussels; the 1933 Century of Progress Exposition in Chicago; the 1939 and 1964 New York World’s Fairs; Expo ’67 in Montreal; Expo ’70 in Osaka, Japan; the 1992 Universal Exposition in Seville, Spain; and Expo 2010 in Shanghai, China.

The fairs and expos will be critically examined to determine how they delivered innovation, promoted patriotism and nationalism, offered critiques and contributed insights to our understanding of cultural history. These public events were often venues for experimentation as well as affirmation. The fairs and expos offered emerging and established artists and architects a platform for experimentation. Students will be challenged to discover innovations and influences connected to these fairs and expos and to explore the emergence of Modernism. Finally, fairgrounds will be examined as evolving Cultural Landscapes, and their preservation, reuse, and adaptation over time will be considered.

The student is responsible for identifying internship opportunities and negotiating with the host institution. A list of available internships is available in the lobby of the Art History Department; but the student is also free to locate and arrange his/her own internship, subject to approval by the Undergraduate Director.

 

Fall 2014 Graduate Courses

530. SEMINAR IN GLOBAL CULTURAL HERITAGE

(CAC, M 1:00-3:40, VH001, Harvey, Index 09389)

This seminar addresses crucial issues of conservation and preservation within the rapidly changing world of the 21st century.

It is interdisciplinary in focus. Interested students from other disciplines are welcome.

Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Syria, Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. Migration, changing demographics, shifting populations, global urbanization, and climate change are reshaping the cultural landscape of the 21st century, and bringing about dramatic changes in theoretical and practical approaches to preservation on national, international and local levels. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market. This seminar examines these issues within the context of current preservation theory and practice.

Goals

To examine current threats to cultural heritage worldwide and to assess international and national initiatives to protect our global cultural heritage.

To become familiar with the global perspective on tangible and intangible heritage that increasingly informs preservation theory and practice in the 21st century.

To become aware of research and career opportunities within the field of Cultural Heritage Preservation that relate to your field of specialization.

Issues we will examine include:

Who Owns the Past?; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management and Protection; UNESCO and World Heritage; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting; the Role and Purpose of Museums; Restitution-WW II and beyond; Cultural Tourism;; Philosophy and Practice in Conservation and Preservation. Requirements: Short oral reports on reading; Research paper and oral report.

Requirements:

Attendance:

This is a seminar. Students are expected to attend all classes and to participate in class discussion. Throughout the semester, students will present brief reports on assigned readings or on topics to be researched on the Internet.

Reading:

Readings are available on Sakai. In addition to the assigned reading, additional material will serve as a valuable resource for research topics. The Internet, current newspapers, and periodicals are valuable resources that will be consulted regularly for research and to keep up to date on cultural property issues in general. A list of valuable Internet sites will be posted with the syllabus.

Research Paper:

There will be a research paper of approximately 12-15 pages.

Students registered for 082:530 should consult with the instructor to design a topic related to their particular focus within the Program in Art History, CHAPS or related fields.

Grading: 1/4 Attendance and participation in discussion based on readings.

               1/4 mini presentations (Case studies and student reports)

               1/2 Research project, including paper and oral presentation.

590. INTERNSHIP: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(By arrangement; Special permission required; Index 05229)

593. TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Heritage, Planning, and Contested Spatial Practices in Divided Cities

(CAC, Thursdays, 1:00-3:40, VH001, Bakshi, Index 20690)

Course Objectives: This course will introduce students to a broad range of issues of relevance in contested or divided cities, including planning, heritage management, ‘coexistence’, memory, and myth. By the end of the course, students should have a general understanding of the many tools and vehicles through which contested places are reconfigured to serve political goals. It will be emphasized that this is accomplished not only through planning and material interventions, but also through administrative policies, commemorative practices, and imaginative and mythical reconstructions of the city.

Course Format: The course will be organized along four broad themes; The History of Division in Cities; Heritage, Commemoration, Representation; Planning and Spatial Practices; and Memory, History, and Myth. Classes will consist of lectures on the themes outlined below, allowing time for group discussion in each class.   Discussions will attempt to connect the material covered in the lectures with related contemporary issues in cities familiar to the students.

 

594. TOPICS IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Architectural Conservation: A Sustainable Approach

(CAC, W23, 9:50am-12:50pm, VH104, Hewitt, Index 09966)

This course, co-listed for graduate as well as undergraduate students, presents an alternative view of architectural conservation based upon the new schema of sustainability. Since buildings cannot be separated from their ecological and historical context, it makes sense to view their continued life as a part of the biosphere. Lectures will cover the history of architectural conservation during the first half of the course, and explore new concepts in preservation during the second half. Requirements include two exams and a research paper.

 

603. ADVANCED TOPICS CHAPS: Cultural Resource Management and Global Cultural Heritage Preservation

(CAC, T6&7, 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, Index #09388)

Cultural resource management, at both national and international levels, is an interdisciplinary field which is, 1. conducted in compliance with environmental and historic preservation laws and, 2. concerned with the management of cultural resources, including archaeological sites, historic buildings and districts, cultural landscapes, heritage objects, and intangible heritage. This advanced undergraduate and graduate course considers the methodology and practice of cultural resource management at both national and international levels - as well as from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Issues to be addressed in this seminar course include: What is Cultural Resource Management and how is it guided and practiced in the U.S. as well as other nations?; What are cultural resources and why must they be managed?; Cultural Resource Management identification, evaluation and management methods in the U.S.; Cultural Resource Management business and ethics; Indigenous heritage, descendant communities, and the issue of control over cultural resources; Cultural landscapes and traditional cultural properties; Threats to international cultural heritage (war, natural disasters, looting); and Cultural Resource Management’s contribution to strategies for cultural heritage management and preservation.

Course Goals:

•             To understand the interdisciplinary nature and scope of Cultural Resource Management as a compliance-related field and practice;

•             To describe the methods and business of Cultural Resource Management as practiced by archaeologists, architectural historians, and site managers;

•             To compare how Cultural Resource Management is practiced nationally, internationally, and by indigenous peoples;

•             To assess how Cultural Resource Management organizations and operations work together at community, national, and international levels towards the preservation of cultural resources (both tangible and intangible) under threat from development, warfare, and natural disasters;

•             To foster a critical, global, and interdisciplinary perspective on Cultural Resource Management and its application to real world problems such as globalization, industrialization, and climate change.

Requirements:

Students are expected to attend all classes, to complete all class readings and assignments, and to participate in all class discussions. As this is primarily a seminar (though will also include “mini-lectures” by KWB), students will be assigned to present brief reports on assigned readings or on topics to be researched throughout the semester.

Work and assignments for this seminar course include one home assignment, regular short presentations on assigned readings, an in-class midterm, a research paper (12-15 pages for undergraduates, and 15-20 pages for graduate students,) an in-class presentation on research paper research; and a take-home exam.

 

607. CHAPS ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 10493)

 

707. RESEARCH CULTURAL HERITAGE (CHAPS)

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 10337)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

 

Spring 2014 Undergraduate Courses


CORE COURSE

Historic Preservation, 10:762:448, Index #06431

Listokin (Thursday 6:10-8:40 pm, Civic Square Building 261)

The scope of historic preservation has expanded significantly. An overview of historical evolution of the preservation movement in the United States, examining important public preservation regulations and programs and the economics of historic preservation.

- OR -

II. Developing/Preserving World Cities, 10:762:496:01, Index #11775

David Listokin (Monday, 9:50-12:30, Civic Square Building 170)

This class will consider the subject of development and preservation in large cities (and other places) and will examine this interaction from an international perspective.

CHAPS ELECTIVES

01:082:441 Global Heritage and the City: Preservation of Historic Urban Landscapes

Section 01, Index #10075

Instructor: Catherine Boland Erkkila, PhD

Course Description:

Historic urban landscapes rank among the most abundant and diverse manifestations of our common cultural heritage. With over 230 inhabited cities around the world listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, and with over half of the world’s population residing in urban areas, preservation of historic urban landscapes has become a contested issue. Rapid urbanization threatens historic structures and spaces and yet cities need to change and grow in response to the needs of their inhabitants. Using UNESCO’s 2011 Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape as an important backdrop for the course, we will examine the issues surrounding historic urban landscapes including the role of heritage tourism, contested spaces within cities, and adaptive use and sustainability initiatives.

Using examples from around the world, this seminar will address several questions: How are historic urban landscapes unique? How do we accommodate the needs for modernization and development in historic cities and city centers without compromising historic character and integrity? What are the limits of acceptable change in cities and what criteria are applied for evaluation and assessment of historic sites and landscapes? What is the role of heritage tourism in urban areas? Why are certain forms of urban heritage neglected or overlooked?

Student Learning Objectives:

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:                            

•             Think critically about urban spaces, urban development and sustainability, and heritage conservation

•             Demonstrate clear understanding of UNESCO’s Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape

•             Analyze the urban conservation tools available in a historic landscape or neighborhood

•             Understand the role of various actors and stakeholders that are involved in and/or affected by urban heritage conservation

•             Identify the benefits and drawbacks of heritage tourism as an urban development strategy

Class format and requirements:

This course follows a seminar format. Students will be expected to attend each class and engage in discussion of each week’s readings, which will be organized as a rotation of students in charge of presenting readings and posting discussion questions (at least 2) on Sakai prior to the class. Students will also be expected to complete a written research paper (15-20 pages) on a topic of their choice, selected with permission of the instructor, and present it to the class in the final two weeks of the semester.

 

01:082:441(Global) Heritage and the Role of Museums in the 21st Century

Section 01, Index #10076

CAC, Tuesdays 9:50-12:30, VH001

Instructor: Emily L. Spratt

Course Description:

This seminar examines the historical development of the museum as a cultural institution and its role in the construction of local and global conceptions of heritage. The course will pay particular attention to the ways in which the museum reflects a perspective of the world that is shaped by the valuation and systematization of our knowledge of it. We will explore the origins of the museum in relation to Renaissance art and nature collections and its epistemological foundations, in the culture of the Enlightenment, to its evolution as an arbiter of cultural patrimony in an increasingly globalized world. The role of museums in the identity politics of the modern nation-state will be critically analyzed in the seminar through a series of case studies that will take us halfway around the globe. Through an investigation of museums from New York, Philadelphia, Salvador, Paris, Venice, Sofia, Corfu, Athens, to Moscow, the course will consider a broad range of themes including post-colonialism, nationalism, heritage and identity formation, memory, nostalgia, authenticity, and the representation of alterity in the museum. This course is interdisciplinary in focus and open to qualified upper lever undergraduates and graduate students from schools and departments across the university.

Seminar Goals:

•             To examine the evolution of the museum from its origins in the culture of the Renaissance to its role in today’s globalized societies.

•             To analyze the degree to which identity politics and notions of the nation/state ideologically influence cultural institutions.

•             To foster an awareness of the current debates surrounding issues of global heritage and cultural patrimony through diverse and multidisciplinary perspectives.

•             To enhance the ability of students to debate different sides of international museum case studies in a constructive learning environment.

•             To promote analytical skills that are informed by historical understanding, local and global perspectives, ethical awareness, the theoretical foundations of the field, and contemporary debates of the subject.

Course Format and Assignments:

The course follows a seminar format. Students are expected to attend each class and to engage in discussion of the weekly readings. There will be weekly mini-presentations of the readings that will rotate amongst the seminar participants. Independent museum trips to New Brunswick, Princeton, New York City, and Philadelphia are recommended and four museum visits from the list of institutions provided in the syllabus are required. Students may organize visits according to their own schedule yet also have the option of instructor led visits to the recommended museums on four (TBA) Saturdays during the term. A research paper on a topic of the student’s choice that ties into the larger themes of the seminar and is approved by the instructor is required (10-12 pages for undergraduates and 18-20 pages for graduates). Presentations of the student’s research will take place in the last two weeks of the semester.

01:082:442 Special Topics in Historic Preservation: Laws of Cultural Heritage and Preservation

Section 01, Index #09263

CAC, Tuesdays 4:30-7:30, VH001

Instructor: Cynthia Jacob

In today's world, both the popular and the academic press are filled with articles about stolen and repatriated art and artifacts, art theft rings, and the current troubles of museums. Art managers, law enforcement offices, and museum administrators are regularly faced with these issues and for those interested in these fields, it is important to be able to recognize them. This course will acquaint both CHAPS students and students interested in laws applicable to the art world in general, such as legal status of museums as institutions, obligations of museum trustees, legal obligations of dealers, auction houses and art merchants, and the rights of private parties as owners of art. The course will also consider the movement of cultural property in wartime, the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property and its implementing United States legislation, and patrimony laws. These laws have shifted the focus of cultural heritage preservation, creating a new area of study reflected in case law. The course will also consider statutory responses arising out of cultural heritage issues unique to the United States, such as the Native American Graves Repatriation Act, and national and local historic preservation laws. This course is designed for those pursuing a Master’s Degree in Cultural Heritage and Preservation, as well as those students pursuing a Certificate in Museum Studies. Undergraduates who have taken the introductory Cultural Heritage and Preservation course are welcome to take this course with advance permission of the instructor. Two or three short papers (not exceeding three pages) on assigned topics, two quizzes, and a longer paper of the student’s choosing are required.

01:082:448, Internship Cultural Heritage/Historic Preservation

Index #66542

By Arrangment - special permission required.

 

Spring 2014 Graduate Courses

CORE COURSE

521. Historic Preservation

34:970:521 Index: 06438

Listokin (Thursday 6:10-8:40 Civic Square Building 261)

The scope of historic preservation has expanded significantly. An overview of historical evolution of the preservation movement in the United States, examining important public preservation regulations and programs and the economics of historic preservation.

Developing/Preserving World Cities

34:970:522:01 Index: 16351

Listokin (Monday 9:50-12:30 Civic Square Building 11)

This class will consider the subject of development and preservation in large cities (and other places) and will examine this interaction from an international perspective.

CHAPS ELECTIVES

 

592. ART HISTORY SEMINAR: CONSTRUCTING THE VICTORIAN CITY: ENVISIONING NEW YORK AND LONDON

(CAC, W2, 9:50-12:30, Voorhees Grad Lounge, Yanni, Index 16572)

This graduate seminar will explore the cultural and architectural history of two cities, London and New York, focusing on the long 19th century. I approach the city as a built space, as a crucible for the formation of social identities; the city here is an ever-changing environment particularly conducive to flows of people, ideas, and things. London and New York, the commercial capitals of the nineteenth century in the west, are here broadly conceived to include the entire built environment, from the grand gestures of urban planners to the alleys of the East End and the tenements of the Lower East Side; we will study reform attempts, slum clearance, and the settlement movement. The gendered and sexed experience of the city will also be examined. We will analyze the vast social and physical changes wrought by industry. Several sessions of the class will delve into building types (as defined by purpose, not shape): these include parks, museums, exhibitions, railroad stations, apartment houses, and office buildings. The historical construct of “city vs. country” will also be explored. (On that theme, students will be expected to attend a special event hosted by the Rutgers British Studies Center about Downton Abbey.) Together we will read accounts of the city as it was recorded by tourists, social reformers, architecture critics, and historians. Primary sources will include Engels, Pugin, Riis, Mumford, and Van Rensselaer. Secondary sources will include Seth Koven, Matt Houlbrook, Carol Willis, Andrew Dolkart, and Matt Lasner.

16:082:593 Global Heritage and the City: Preservation of Historic Urban Landscapes

Section 01, Index #08633

Instructor: Catherine Boland Erkkila, PhD

Course Description:

Historic urban landscapes rank among the most abundant and diverse manifestations of our common cultural heritage. With over 230 inhabited cities around the world listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, and with over half of the world’s population residing in urban areas, preservation of historic urban landscapes has become a contested issue. Rapid urbanization threatens historic structures and spaces and yet cities need to change and grow in response to the needs of their inhabitants. Using UNESCO’s 2011 Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape as an important backdrop for the course, we will examine the issues surrounding historic urban landscapes including the role of heritage tourism, contested spaces within cities, and adaptive use and sustainability initiatives.

Using examples from around the world, this seminar will address several questions: How are historic urban landscapes unique? How do we accommodate the needs for modernization and development in historic cities and city centers without compromising historic character and integrity? What are the limits of acceptable change in cities and what criteria are applied for evaluation and assessment of historic sites and landscapes? What is the role of heritage tourism in urban areas? Why are certain forms of urban heritage neglected or overlooked?

Student Learning Objectives:

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:                          

•             Think critically about urban spaces, urban development and sustainability, and heritage conservation

•             Demonstrate clear understanding of UNESCO’s Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape

•             Analyze the urban conservation tools available in a historic landscape or neighborhood

•             Understand the role of various actors and stakeholders that are involved in and/or affected by urban heritage conservation

•             Identify the benefits and drawbacks of heritage tourism as an urban development strategy

Class format and requirements:

This course follows a seminar format. Students will be expected to attend each class and engage in discussion of each week’s readings, which will be organized as a rotation of students in charge of presenting readings and posting discussion questions (at least 2) on Sakai prior to the class. Students will also be expected to complete a written research paper (15-20 pages) on a topic of their choice, selected with permission of the instructor, and present it to the class in the final two weeks of the semester.

(Global) Heritage and the Role of Museums in the 21st Century

Section 01, Index #14801

CAC, Tuesdays 9:50-12:30, VH001

Instructor: Emily L. Spratt

Course Description:

This seminar examines the historical development of the museum as a cultural institution and its role in the construction of local and global conceptions of heritage. The course will pay particular attention to the ways in which the museum reflects a perspective of the world that is shaped by the valuation and systematization of our knowledge of it. We will explore the origins of the museum in relation to Renaissance art and nature collections and its epistemological foundations, in the culture of the Enlightenment, to its evolution as an arbiter of cultural patrimony in an increasingly globalized world. The role of museums in the identity politics of the modern nation-state will be critically analyzed in the seminar through a series of case studies that will take us halfway around the globe. Through an investigation of museums from New York, Philadelphia, Salvador, Paris, Venice, Sofia, Corfu, Athens, to Moscow, the course will consider a broad range of themes including post-colonialism, nationalism, heritage and identity formation, memory, nostalgia, authenticity, and the representation of alterity in the museum. This course is interdisciplinary in focus and open to qualified upper lever undergraduates and graduate students from schools and departments across the university.

Seminar Goals:

•             To examine the evolution of the museum from its origins in the culture of the Renaissance to its role in today’s globalized societies.

•             To analyze the degree to which identity politics and notions of the nation/state ideologically influence cultural institutions.

•             To foster an awareness of the current debates surrounding issues of global heritage and cultural patrimony through diverse and multidisciplinary perspectives.

•             To enhance the ability of students to debate different sides of international museum case studies in a constructive learning environment.

•             To promote analytical skills that are informed by historical understanding, local and global perspectives, ethical awareness, the theoretical foundations of the field, and contemporary debates of the subject.

Course Format and Assignments:

The course follows a seminar format. Students are expected to attend each class and to engage in discussion of the weekly readings. There will be weekly mini-presentations of the readings that will rotate amongst the seminar participants. Independent museum trips to New Brunswick, Princeton, New York City, and Philadelphia are recommended and four museum visits from the list of institutions provided in the syllabus are required. Students may organize visits according to their own schedule yet also have the option of instructor led visits to the recommended museums on four (TBA) Saturdays during the term. A research paper on a topic of the student’s choice that ties into the larger themes of the seminar and is approved by the instructor is required (10-12 pages for undergraduates and 18-20 pages for graduates). Presentations of the student’s research will take place in the last two weeks of the semester.

16:082:603 Special Topics in Historic Preservation: Laws of Cultural Heritage and Preservation

Section 01, Index #10077

CAC, Tuesdays 4:30-7:30, VH001

Instructor: Cynthia Jacob

In today's world, both the popular and the academic press are filled with articles about stolen and repatriated art and artifacts, art theft rings, and the current troubles of museums. Art managers, law enforcement offices, and museum administrators are regularly faced with these issues and for those interested in these fields, it is important to be able to recognize them. This course will acquaint both CHAPS students and students interested in laws applicable to the art world in general, such as legal status of museums as institutions, obligations of museum trustees, legal obligations of dealers, auction houses and art merchants, and the rights of private parties as owners of art. The course will also consider the movement of cultural property in wartime, the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property and its implementing United States legislation, and patrimony laws. These laws have shifted the focus of cultural heritage preservation, creating a new area of study reflected in case law. The course will also consider statutory responses arising out of cultural heritage issues unique to the United States, such as the Native American Graves Repatriation Act, and national and local historic preservation laws. This course is designed for those pursuing a Master’s Degree in Cultural Heritage and Preservation, as well as those students pursuing a Certificate in Museum Studies. Undergraduates who have taken the introductory Cultural Heritage and Preservation course are welcome to take this course with advance permission of the instructor. Two or three short papers (not exceeding three pages) on assigned topics, two quizzes, and a longer paper of the student’s choosing are required.

16:082:590. INTERNSHIP: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(By arrangement; Special permission required; Index 25533)

16:082:607. CHAPS ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 31397)

16:082:707. RESEARCH CULTURAL HERITAGE (CHAPS)

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 31224)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

CHAPS
Department of Art History
Voorhees Hall
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
  Phone 848.932.7041
Fax 732.932.1261