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Fall 2013 Undergraduate Courses

CORE COURSE

 

430. SEMINAR IN CULTURAL HERITAGE PRESERVATION

(CAC, M6/7, 4:30-7:30pm, AL SEM, Harvey, Index 26022)

This seminar addresses crucial issues of conservation and preservation within the rapidly changing world of the 21st century

It is interdisciplinary in focus. Interested students from other disciplines are welcome.

Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market. This seminar examines these issues within the context of current preservation theory and practice.

Issues to be addressed include: Who Owns the Past?; UNESCO and World Heritage; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting (museums, collectors, dealers); The Destruction of Cultural Heritage during War or Ethnic Conflict; Looting and willful destruction of Historic Sites and Buildings; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management

Goals:

•             To define and identify current threats to the conservation of the monuments, sites, works of art and material culture that constitute our cultural heritage worldwide.

•             To assess international and national initiatives being taken to protect cultural heritage, both tangible and intangible.

•             To enable you to formulate, discuss, and defend your own values through critical analysis of the material covered and to become an effective advocate for the preservation of cultural heritage.

•             To raise awareness of a flourishing field of Cultural Heritage Preservation and career opportunities within the field

•             To encourage you to develop an international perspective that will enrich your future studies.

           .

Requirements:

Attendance:

Students are expected to attend all classes and to participate in class discussion. Throughout the semester, students will present brief reports on assigned readings or on topics to be researched on the Internet.

Reading:

Readings are available on Sakai. They are designed to introduce you to cultural heritage issues. In addition to the assigned reading, additional material will serve as a valuable resource for research topics. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with this material as it relates to their projects. The Internet, current newspapers, and periodicals are valuable resources that should be consulted regularly for research and to keep up to date on cultural property issues in general. There is a list of valuable Internet sites posted with the syllabus.

Quiz:

There will be a midterm quiz.

Paper:

There will be a research paper of approximately 10-12 pages.

Students registered for 082:430 should consult with the instructor to design a topic related to their particular focus within the Program in Art History and/or CHAPS.

Grading: 1/3 Attendance and participation in discussion based on readings.

               1/3 Quiz and mini presentations (Case studies and student reports)

               1/3 Research project, including paper and oral presentation

 

CHAPS ELECTIVES

441. STUDIES IN CULTURAL HERITAGE/HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(CAC, T2/3, 9:50am-12:30pm, VH001, Burrows, Cross-listed with 594:01, Index 28094)

The New Brunswick Region: a case study in archaeology, land-use and historic preservation

This course will provide students with hands-on experience in the identification, evaluation, and management of archaeological resources in the context of modern land-use.

Archaeological resources are something of a special case in historic preservation. Consequently they are not as commonly incorporated into conventional historic preservation planning as are standing historic structures or districts: its most readily understood components.

Students will develop an understanding of the legal and regulatory tools available for identifying, evaluating and treating archaeological resources, and how they can be integrated with land-use and development planning. Exposure will also be given to the use of primary historic sources in reconstructing urban topography through time, the use of archaeological excavation reports as tools for understanding the past, and to basic archaeological concepts and field and laboratory techniques

Students, working in groups, will develop several products as a result of the course. These are anticipated to be:

1. An archaeological sensitivity map of the historic core of New Brunswick.

2. A model archaeological ordinance for the City of New Brunswick.

3. A sustainable public archaeology program for New Brunswick, focusing on the Buccleuch Mansion.

4. A design for a popular publication/video/exhibit/website on the history and archaeology of New Brunswick.

Students will also be assigned a specific individual research topic which will be presented to the class. There will be a final exam covering broad aspects of archaeology and historic preservation.

A small-scale archaeological investigation of a location on the Rutgers campus or elsewhere in New Brunswick is included in the course.

The course will be taught by Dr. Ian Burrow, RPA. Dr. Burrow is Vice-President of Hunter Research, Inc., a cultural resource management company based in Trenton, NJ. He is Past-President of the American Cultural Resources Association and of the Register of Professional Archaeologists. He is currently serving as Vice-President for Government Relations for the American Cultural Resources Association. He has previously taught Archaeology and Historic Preservation in the CHAPS program.

Professor David Listokin, Ph.D., Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, will also be contributing to aspects of the course

442. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CULTURAL HERITAGE/HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(CAC, T6/7, 4:30-7:30 pm, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, Cross-listed with 603:01, Index 37720)

Re/Claiming the Past: Communities, Material Culture, and Cultural Heritage

This course explores the diverse ways in which cultures and communities have utilized and

reclaimed the past by using archaeology and material culture (architecture, artifacts, and art)

to position themselves, both socially and politically, within the modern world. Drawing from

readings and research from the fields of archaeology and cultural heritage, class topics will

include cultural heritage, authenticity, and invented traditions; nationalism and the mis/uses

of archaeology; collections and collecting in the era of colonialism; public/community

archaeology at sites of U.S. national importance; imagined and re/created communities;

historic preservation of traditional (as well as intangible) cultural properties, and the

growing efforts of modern indigenous communities to reframe and reclaim their own history and space in the postcolonial era through the use of archaeology and display of museum collections.

447. INTERNSHIP IN HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(Hours by arrangement, By permission of the CHAPS director, See department staff for special permission number Index 26023)

ELECTIVE COURSES OFFERED IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

01:070:105 Introduction to Archaeology

   Section 01, index 28423, T 9:15-10:35 Hickman 101, F 9:15-10:35 Hickman 101, M 10:55-12:15 BIO 206,   Schrire

   Section 02, index 27670, T 9:15-10:35 Hickman 101, F 9:15-10:35 Hickman 101, M 12:35-1:55 BIO 206

   Section 03, index 27671, T 9:15-10:35 Hickman 101, F 9:15-10:35 Hickman 101, M 3:55-5:15, BIO 206

01:070:208 Survey of Historical Archaeology, index 36904, T, TH 3:55-5:15, BIO 206, Schrire

 

ART HISTORY

01:082:375. RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ARCHITECTURE

(CAC, T4TH4, 1:10-2:30pm, ZAM EDR, Marder, Prerequisites: 01:082:105,106 or permission of instructor, Index 36685)

This course will emphasize the major developments in Italy from 1400 to 1700, from the birth of Renaissance architecture in Italy to the end of the baroque era. Some of the developments pertain to the design of building types (houses, palaces, churches, civic sturctures), some to garden design and urban planning, some to building theories (like those of Alberti and Palladio), some to construction techniques (from wooden models to massive fortresses), and some to individual architects (like Brunelleschi, Bramante, Bernini, and Borromini). All of these topics will be covered in lectures and discussions and readings. There will be two short (3-page) papers, a midterm exam and a final exam. Class participation will be the key to a high grade.

01:082:391. NINETEENTH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE IN THE UNITED STATES

(CAC, T2F2, 9:50-11:10am, MU301, Yanni, Prerequisites: 01:082:105,106 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with 01:050:309. Special notation: credit not given for both this course and 01:050:309 Index 36510)

This course offers an overview of the social and intellectual history of architecture in the United States from about 1750 to 1900. The lectures will analyze the role of architecture in societal transformations (the development of nationhood, industrialization, and urbanization.) In my own research, I look at the architecture of public institutions, like museums, insane asylums, and universities. In this class, you will notice an emphasis on the invention of new building types, including colleges, government buildings, prisons, hospitals, railroad stations, and World's Fairs. We will also study the novel building techniques and materials of the nineteenth century. Readings will be posted on Sakai; there is no single textbook. The lectures will be posted on Sakai shortly after I give them, not before. This class counts as an elective in the historic preservation certificate program, but it is not a core course.

Expectations: Attendance is mandatory. Your grade will be based on attendance, participation, two tests, one short paper, and one 10-page research paper. Additional projects (including a self-funded visit to a site in New York City) may be required, depending on student interest.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES

11:372:409 NJ Planning Practice, index 38805, W 5:35-8:35pm, ENR-123, Chalofsky

GEOGRAPHY

01:450:205 World Cultural Regions, index 23138, MTH 12:00-1:20, LSH-B269

01:450:321 Geographic Information Systems, index 30093, T 1:40-3:00 LSH-B105, T3:20-4:40, LSH-B266

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

11:550:330 History of Landscape Architecture, index 38321, MTH 10:55-12:15, BL-128

 

Fall 2013 Graduate Courses

CORE COURSE

16:082:530. SEMINAR IN GLOBAL CULTURAL HERITAGE PRESERVATION

(CAC, M5, 1:00-3:40pm, VH001, Harvey, Index 30118)

This seminar addresses crucial issues of conservation and preservation within the rapidly changing world of the 21st century.

It is interdisciplinary in focus. Interested students from other disciplines are welcome.

Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market. This seminar examines these issues within the context of current preservation theory and practice.

Goals

•             To examine current threats to cultural heritage worldwide and to assess international and national initiatives to protect our global cultural heritage.

•             To become familiar with the global perspective on tangible and intangible heritage that increasingly informs preservation theory and practice in the 21st century.

•             To become aware of research and career opportunities within the field of Cultural Heritage Preservation that relate to your field of specialization.

Issues we will examine include:

Who Owns the Past?; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management and Protection; UNESCO and World Heritage; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting; the Role and Purpose of Museums; Restitution-WW II and beyond; Cultural Tourism;; Philosophy and Practice in Conservation and Preservation. Requirements: Short oral reports on reading; Research paper and oral report.

Requirements:

Attendance:

This is a seminar. Students are expected to attend all classes and to participate in class discussion. Throughout the semester, students will present brief reports on assigned readings or on topics to be researched on the Internet.

Reading:

Readings are available on Sakai. In addition to the assigned reading, additional material will serve as a valuable resource for research topics. The Internet, current newspapers, and periodicals are valuable resources that will be consulted regularly for research and to keep up to date on cultural property issues in general. A list of valuable Internet sites will be posted with the syllabus.

Research Paper:

There will be a research paper of approximately 12-15 pages.

Students registered for 082:530 should consult with the instructor to design a topic related to their particular focus within the Program in Art History, CHAPS or related fields.

Grading: 1/4 Attendance and participation in discussion based on readings.

                   1/4 mini presentations (Case studies and student reports)

                   1/2 Research project, including paper and oral presentation.

CHAPS ELECTIVES

16:082:590. INTERNSHIP: CULTURAL HERITAGE AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(By arrangement; Special permission required; Index 25533)

 

16:082:594. STUDIES IN CULTURAL HERITAGE/HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(CAC, W 2/3, 9:50am-12:30pm, VH001, Burrow, Cross-listed with 441:01, Index 30780)

The New Brunswick Region: A Case Study In Archaeology, Land-Use And Historic Preservation

This course will provide students with hands-on experience in the identification, evaluation, and management of archaeological resources in the context of modern land-use.

Archaeological resources are something of a special case in historic preservation. Consequently they are not as commonly incorporated into conventional historic preservation planning as are standing historic structures or districts: its most readily understood components.

Students will develop an understanding of the legal and regulatory tools available for identifying, evaluating and treating archaeological resources, and how they can be integrated with land-use and development planning. Exposure will also be given to the use of primary historic sources in reconstructing urban topography through time, the use of archaeological excavation reports as tools for understanding the past, and to basic archaeological concepts and field and laboratory techniques

Students, working in groups, will develop several products as a result of the course. These are anticipated to be:

1. An archaeological sensitivity map of the historic core of New Brunswick.

2. A model archaeological ordinance for the City of New Brunswick.

3. A sustainable public archaeology program for New Brunswick, focusing on the Buccleuch Mansion.

4. A design for a popular publication/video/exhibit/website on the history and archaeology of New Brunswick.

Students will also be assigned a specific individual research topic which will be presented to the class. There will be a final exam covering broad aspects of archaeology and historic preservation.

A small-scale archaeological investigation of a location on the Rutgers campus or elsewhere in New Brunswick is included in the course.

The course will be taught by Dr. Ian Burrow, RPA. Dr. Burrow is Vice-President of Hunter Research, Inc., a cultural resource management company based in Trenton, NJ. He is Past-President of the American Cultural Resources Association and of the Register of Professional Archaeologists. He is currently serving as Vice-President for Government Relations for the American Cultural Resources Association. He has previously taught Archaeology and Historic Preservation in the CHAPS program.

Professor David Listokin, Ph.D., Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, will also be contributing to aspects of the course.

16:082:603. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CULTURAL HERITAGE/HISTORIC PRESERVATION

(CAC, T6/7, 4:30-7:30pm, VH001, Woodhouse-Beyer, Cross-listed with 442, Index 30117)

Re/Claiming the Past: Communities, Material Culture, and Cultural Heritage

This course explores the diverse ways in which cultures and communities have utilized and

reclaimed the past by using archaeology and material culture (architecture, artifacts, and art)

to position themselves, both socially and politically, within the modern world. Drawing from

readings and research from the fields of archaeology and cultural heritage, class topics will

include cultural heritage, authenticity, and invented traditions; nationalism and the mis/uses

of archaeology; collections and collecting in the era of colonialism; public/community

archaeology at sites of U.S. national importance; imagined and re/created communities;

historic preservation of traditional (as well as intangible) cultural properties, and the

growing efforts of modern indigenous communities to reframe and reclaim their own history and space in the postcolonial era through the use of archaeology and display of museum collections.

 

16:082:607. CHAPS ADVANCED INTERNSHIP/FIELD STUDY

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 31397)

 

16:082:707. RESEARCH CULTURAL HERITAGE (CHAPS)

(By arrangement, Special permission required, Index 31224)

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis.

Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

ELECTIVE COURSES OFFERED IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

16:450:516 Urban Geography, index 36923, T 1:40-4:40, LSH-B120, Ghertner

34:970:604 Land Development Practice, index 21854, T 6:10-8:40, CSB-369, Burchell

Historic Preservation & State Historic Tax Credits (SHTC)

The studio will examine state historic tax credits (SHTC). The SHTC is offered to foster the rehabilitation of historic properties in about 30 states. For example, with a 25 percent SHTC, the developer of a $1 million historic rehabilitation project would be eligible for a $0.25 million reduction in state taxes. SHTCs are often used in combination with federal historic tax credits (FHTC), the latter, a 20 percent credit on federal taxes. The studio will examine: (1) the provisions of the SHTCs by state (e.g., tax credit percent and eligibility), (2) the use of SHTCs (e.g., number and dollar value of projects and illustrative case study applications); and (3) the impact of the SHTCs (e.g., motivating investment and revitalizing older neighborhoods).

The studio has two clients: Preservation New Jersey (PNJ) and the National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP). As statewide and national preservation organizations, PNJ and NTHP wish to better understand and track the SHTC as applied in the United States. (New Jersey has a proposed, but not enacted SHTC.)

CHAPS
Department of Art History
Voorhees Hall
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
  Phone 848.932.7041
Fax 732.932.1261