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Undergraduate Courses - Spring 2012

CORE COURSE

Historic Preservation, 10:762:448, Index #67382

Listokin and Listokin (Thursday 6:10-8:40 pm, Civic Square Building 261)

The scope of historic preservation has expanded significantly. An overview of historical evolution of the preservation movement in the United States, examining important public preservation regulations and programs and the economics of historic preservation.

- OR -

II. Development/Preservation of Large Cities, 10:762:496:01, Index #75347

David Listokin (Monday, 9:50-12:30, Civic Square Building 261)

Students who have already had a course in American Architecture should register for Course II.

The class will electronically link (via Skype/other means) Rutgers University in New Jersey and the school of Architecture at the Second University of Naples (SUN) and the Region Centre for Cultural Heritage, Ecology and Economy (BENECON). The class will be taught in parallel by David Listokin (Rutgers) and faculty from SUN and BENECON.

This class will consider the subject of development and preservation in large cities (and other places) and will examine this interaction from an international perspective, considering case studies in the United States (with an emphasis on New York City) and Italy (with discussion of Naples and Pompeii). New York City has some of the leading cases in the United States of development triumphing over preservation (e.g., demolition of Penn Central Station) as well as opposite situations (e.g., preservation of Grand Central Station). The same is true in Italy, including Naples and Pompeii.

CHAPS ELECTIVES

01.082.492, Studies in CHAPS, Index# 75604

(Also available to graduate students for graduate credit)

9:50am-12:50pm, VH001, Harvey

Nature, Monuments, and Cultures/ World Heritage and the 21st Century

Focusing on World Heritage Sites, this seminar examines the intersection of nature and culture, analyzing the different roles of human influence in shaping the monuments, sites and landscapes that have been recognized as “of universal value” through nomination to UNESCO’s World Heritage List. How are these sites chosen? How do we define terms such as universal value, integrity, and authenticity, all prerequisites for listing? What are the consequences of being listed? How can such sites be managed and sustained in the face of the challenges of dramatically increased tourism, climate change, encroaching development and population growth, ethnic conflict and war. How do we engage and preserve the cultural links of people to place? Students will pursue reading on all of these issues and conduct research on a particular site or theoretical issue associated with World Heritage. Active participation in discussion and a willingness to engage the issues as a collaborative effort rather that up-down teacher/student process are expected. Requirements include short reports on reading and a research paper (ca. 15 pages) to be presented as a final oral report.

01:082:441, Studies in CHAPS, Index #72346

Tuesday, 4:30-7:30, VH001, Urban

Prerequisite: open to undergrads who have taken the Seminar in Global Heritage Preservation or with instructor permission.

Curating Guantánamo: Public History and Public Awareness

This course is both an introduction to public history and an examination into the contentious history of the U.S. naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. It provides an upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level introduction to the theory, methods, practice, and politics of public history, and allows students to explore the possibilities and challenges of the production and dissemination of histories in nonacademic settings. Students’ work will be part of a collaboration involving universities and colleges across the United States, organized by the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience’s Guantánamo Public Memory Project (http://www.sitesofconscience.org/activities/guantanamo-public-memory-project).

01:082:442, Studies in CHAPS, Index #71153

Monday, 1:10-4:10, VH001, Kahlaoui

Culture, Preservation, and Politics in the Middle East

The Middle East is one of the richest archeological regions in the world. Yet, ironically, military conflicts aimed at establishing stability in the area have contributed to the deterioration of cultural artifacts and sites at an alarming rate. Military action, political indifference, and a vacuum of knowledge – linguistic, artistic, political, and cultural – have endangered the possibilities for preserving the essence of Middle Eastern art and archaeology and the roots of western European tradition. This course is about war and cultural heritage, politics and preservation as the new realities of our future. This course begins with a review of similar situations of war and art, from napoleon to World War II and Vietnam ("we had to destroy it in order to save it"). Our work then moves quickly to a discussion of Middle Eastern art and archaeology, including the sack of the Iraq museum in Baghdad and the looting of sites in the countryside throughout the region. Half of the course is devoted to understanding both the art and archaeology of the region, and the other half is devoted to tracing their fate and their future under the challenge of present circumstances. This course will answer two questions. The first is: what do we need to know about the art history of Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Afghanistan? The second is: what are the threats to its survival for future generations? The course targets art history and CHAPS students. It will emphasize both visual approaches and preservation practices, and their relation to the respective social environments. Requirements will include informal discussion of common readings, oral reports on specific issues, and a 15-page research paper.

01:082:444, Studies in Architectural Preservation, index #75611

Wednesday, 4:30-7:30, VH001, Mills

Architectural Preservation: Philosophy and Practice

The course will explore the fundamentals of architectural preservation through a coordinated program of class discussion, fieldwork, documentation, and case studies. Students will study the sources, methods, and standards that inform preservation practice, and will apply the knowledge gained to real world situations. Working individually and in groups, students will gain familiarity with the range of architectural styles, materials, and construction methods that comprise our physical heritage. Case studies and visits to construction sites will illuminate the preservation issues and approaches that are inherent in preservation projects in New Jersey and other parts of the world. New Brunswick’s local neighborhoods and the Rutgers campus will serve as a laboratory for acquiring skills in the assessment of historic structures. Course discussion will tie these issues and methods to broader, global preservation issues. Course requirements include attendance at each scheduled classes , and grades will be assigned based upon a student's attendance and class participation, as well as on the completion of two short papers, a mid-term quiz, and the presentation of a term project. The short papers may serve as components to the term project at the student's discretion, and may assist in its completion. Students will present their work in class or at historic sites on the Rutgers campus. Field trips to preservation projects will be made where possible and appropriate.

01:082:448, Internship Cultural Heritage/Historic Preservation, Index #66542

By Arrangment - special permission required.

ELECTIVE COURSES OFFERED IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

AMERICAN STUDIES

01:050:308 Culture of Metropolis

Index #75375, T 7:15-10:05pm, ARH-200, Ferguson

ANTHROPOLOGY

01:070:105 Intro to Archaeology

Index #63943, Th 9:15-10:35am, Bio-206 and MW 3:55-5:15pm, HSB-201

Index #68355, Th 10:55-12:15pm, Bio-206 and MW 3:55-5:15pm, HSB-201

Index #68356, Th 2:15-3:35pm, Bio-206 and MW 3:55-5:15pm, HSB-201

ART HISTORY

01:082:355. French Architecture, 1515-1750

(CAC, TTH4, 1:10-2:30pm, ZAM MPR, Marder, Prerequisites: 01:082:105 & 106 or permission of instructor, Index 75606)

Principle developments in French architecture from the time of Francis I (1515-1547) to the reign of Napoleon I. Formal and theoretical developments, individual architects, urban planning, gardens, military architecture, classicism and the Orders, use and function in architecture, great cities, individual monuments.   Course requirements for French Architecture: 1. Class attendance, 2. Two three-page papers, 3. Midterm exam, and 4. Final exam.

01:082:368. Modern American Art

(CAC, MTH3, 11:30am-12:50pm, MU301, Watson, Prerequisite: 01:082:105 and 106 or permission of instructor, Index 76398)

MODERN NORTH AMERICAN VISUAL CULTURE

This course examines the history of North American visual culture from 1876 to the present with an eye toward the creation of visual ?modernity? in North America. We will look at material from both ?art? and ?non-art? contexts and consider its relationship to the fluid social and intellectual formations of modern life. Of special concern are the many social relationships created between the diverse viewers and artists of North America through visual culture. Taking a postcolonial approach, we will examine the way American nationality is constructed through power relationships based on assumptions about race, indigenous rights, and cultural progress. We will explore how the meaning of the nation continues to change across time and space, in dialogue with other forms of local and transnational community that are increasingly globally networked. Course requirements include: three concise essays, midterm and final exams, and class discussion.

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES

11:372:231 Fundamentals of Environmental Planning

Index #60902, MTH 12:35-1:55pm, CDL-102, Tulloch

Principles of environmental planning related to the planning process. Special emphasis on natural principles, policy issues, and social concerns impacting land use outcomes.

GEOGRAPHY

01:450:205 World Cultural Regions

Index #69265, MTH 12:00-1:20pm, BE-253, Bayouth

In this course, we will examine the cultural, environmental, political and socio-economic dimensions of our world, with an emphasis on Africa, Asia and Europe. Organized around the concept of regions, we will observe distinct human activities and physical processes taking place within each, with a special focus on broad themes of environmental change, globalization, economic development and regional diversity. The goal of the course is to let you develop a sense of place and space for each region at the local, national and global scales.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

11:550:330 History of Landscape Architecture

Index #77600, TF 10:55-12:15pm, RAB-204, Goto

This course provides an introduction to the history of landscape architecture around the world, beginning with the Paradise Gardens in Persia and concluding with the design of public parks in North America. The objective of this course is not only to provide an overview of various styles of gardens throughout the ages but also to give students a basic understanding of history as a methodological tool for the conceptualization and design of modern and contemporary landscape. Discussions on social and cultural influences on landscape architecture as well as the philosophical underpinnings of landscape design will also be covered.

PLANNING AND PUBLIC POLICY

10:762:444, American Land Use Policy, Index #70448

Monday, 12:35-3:35, RAB018, Popper

Exploring the diverse connections between America's national development and its land environment. This is essentially a course in ecological history.

 

Fall 2012 Graduate Courses

Global Cultural Heritage 16:082:530 Index: 10930

Prof. Harvey (Monday 1:00 – 3:40 VH001)

Threats to works of art, monuments, and sites have increased exponentially in the last decades. War and ethnic conflict have led to wanton destruction of monuments as diverse as the Bamiyan Buddhas and the Mostar bridge, and to the destruction or dispersal of works of art from museums, monuments, and sites in Egypt, Iraq, Afghanistan, and beyond. The commoditization of art and the booming global art market have led to a global increase in theft and looting of monuments, sites, and religious and secular institutions. Museums, long believed to be sacrosanct, have come under scrutiny regarding policies of restitution regarding works of art confiscated in WW II, and for alleged participation in the illegal art market. The goal of this seminar is to examine current threats to cultural property worldwide and to assess international and national initiatives to protect our global cultural heritage.

Issues we will examine include:

Who Owns the Past?; Cultural Heritage as Commodity; International and National approaches to Cultural Heritage Management and Protection; UNESCO and World Heritage; The Legal and Illegal Market in Historic Material; the Ethics of Collecting; the Role and Purpose of Museums; Restitution-WW II and beyond; Cultural Tourism;; Philosophy and Practice in Conservation and Preservation. Requirements: Short oral reports on reading; Research paper and oral report.

This is an interdisciplinary graduate seminar. Qualified graduate students from other disciplines are welcome to apply. Limit 15 students

Studies in CHAPS: Architectural Conservation: A Sustainable Approach 16:082:594 Index: 11718

Hewitt (Wednesday 9:50 - 12:50 VH001)

This course is an introduction to what we generally call architectural preservation, accounting for the history of the field over the centuries, the theories that have guided the development of the field, and the directions that conservation takes in current practice. Serious attention will be given to a sustainable approach to architecture, in keeping with economic, social, and practical requirements of contemporary life. The course material will consist of readings, discussion, lecture, and some site visits if they can be accommodated by the instructor. The textbook will be John Stubbs, "Time Honored: A Global View of Architectural Conservation," 2009. The instructor is the author of three scholarly books on the American country house, the architecture of Carrere and Hastings, and Gustave Stickley‘s Craftsman Farms, and many other publications. He is an architect with a busy practice that includes original designs and preservation projects.

Advanced Topics CHAPS: Cemeteries, Monuments, and Memorials: Cultural Heritage and Remembering the Dead 16:082:603 Index: 10929

Prof. Woodhouse-Beyer (Tuesday 4:30 - 7:30 VH001)

This cultural heritage course considers the history and material culture of the memory and memorialization of individuals, social groups, and historic events through time, cultures, and landscapes. Our course material will include local, national, and international case studies drawn from archaeology, history, cultural heritage literature, and the contemporary world. Why do we choose to remember/memorialize some individuals and events over others? What sites and spaces stay secular – and what sites and spaces become sacred ground? What sites and spaces are nationally significant – or internationally-significant? How do some sites associated with the dead and historic events become contested ground – and why? This course will require seminar participation and that you spend individual time visiting local sites/cemeteries/monuments and memorials during our course. A Saturday group trip to a noted landscape of memorialization will be organized – and optional.

 

Advanced Intern/Field Study CHAPS 16:082:607 Index: 12504

by Arrangement – Special permission required

Supervised internship or field study related to thesis research. Internships are arranged in the student's area of focus in consultation with the adviser. Required contact hours are a minimum of 80 for 3 credits. Grading will be based upon a research paper or thesis, in a format agreed upon with the adviser, and an evaluation submitted by the host institution.

Research Cultural Heritage CHAPS 16:082:707 Index: 12293

by Arrangement – Special permission required

Directed research for advanced students working on the MA thesis. Students will be supervised and evaluated by their advisor, who is chosen in conjunction with an area of specialization during the first year. Students will be graded on the quality of research and writing leading to the completed MA thesis.

ART HISTORY UNDERGRADUATE COUSE THAT CAN BE TAKEN FOR GRADUATE CREDIT:

The Modern City: Eighty Years of Modern Architecture and Urbanism in New York, 1932 - 2012

16:082:428 Index: 16387

Bzdak (CAC, Wednesday 4:30 - 7:30 VH001)

This course will present an overview of the development of modern architecture and urbanism in New York from 1932, the year of MoMA’s seminal International Style exhibition, to the present. Topics will include the global prominence of the city by mid-century and the development of the United Nations Headquarters; large-scale residential planning; the impact of the Landmarks Preservation Commission Law of 1965; the growth of the city as part of a regional metropolis; and the rise, fall, and rebirth of the World Trade Center site. Topics of study will require students to visit the city, with opportunities for attending lectures and/or exhibitions. Several writing assignments, a midterm exam, and oral presentation will be required.

ELECTIVE COURSES OFFERED IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Rutgers-Newark

26:510:565 Public History: Presenting the Past: Public Histories of

Slavery for the Twenty-First Century

Lyra Monteiro (Thursdays, 5:30-8:10 pm)

This course explores the various ways in which the history of African enslavement in the New World has been remembered and interpreted in contexts ranging from historic sites and museum exhibitions to children’s literature and film, as we build towards developing proposals for new public interpretations of the history of slavery. We will use the history of African enslavement in the New World—a history that touches all of Western Europe, Western and Southern Africa, and the Americas—as a lens into the ways in which different countries and regions have publicly remembered a difficult past. Some of the issues we will explore in this class include: how the method, time, and place in which the past is narrated affect the story that can be told; the tensions between histories created for different kinds of audinces, including locals, tourists, and various descendant communities; and the ways in which the narration of slavery’s history changes over time—a topic that is particularly relevant now, as we mark the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, with an African American in the White House.

In order to address this topic, we will focus on the “primary documents” of public memory, including specific monuments, exhibitions, blogs, and plays. We will supplement this study with readings from the growing body of scholarship on the public history and public memory of slavery, coming out of disciplines including History, Archaeology, Sociology, and American Studies. As a final project, students will develop and present grant proposals for new public interpretations of the history and legacy of slavery, in a venue of their choice.

 

Graduate Courses - Spring 2012


CORE COURSE

Historic Preservation, 34:970:521, Index #67390

Listokin and Listokin (Thursday 6:10-8:40 pm, Civic Square Building 261)

The scope of historic preservation has expanded significantly. An overview of historical evolution of the preservation movement in the United States, examining important public preservation regulations and programs and the economics of historic preservation.

- OR -

Development/Preservation of Large Cities, 34:970:663:01, Index #75347

David Listokin (Monday, 9:50-12:30, Civic Square Building 261)

Students who have already had a course in American Architecture should register for Course II.

The class will electronically link (via Skype/other means) Rutgers University in New Jersey and the school of Architecture at the Second University of Naples (SUN) and the Region Centre for Cultural Heritage, Ecology and Economy (BENECON). The class will be taught in parallel by David Listokin (Rutgers) and faculty from SUN and BENECON.

This class will consider the subject of development and preservation in large cities (and other places) and will examine this interaction from an international perspective, considering case studies in the United States (with an emphasis on New York City) and Italy (with discussion of Naples and Pompeii). New York City has some of the leading cases in the United States of development triumphing over preservation (e.g., demolition of Penn Central Station) as well as opposite situations (e.g., preservation of Grand Central Station). The same is true in Italy, including Naples and Pompeii.

________________________________________

ELECTIVES

Studies in CHAPS, 01.082.492, Index# 75604

(Also available to graduate students for graduate credit)

9:50am-12:50pm, VH001, Harvey

Nature, Monuments, and Cultures/ World Heritage and the 21st Century

Focusing on World Heritage Sites, this seminar examines the intersection of nature and culture, analyzing the different roles of human influence in shaping the monuments, sites and landscapes that have been recognized as “of universal value” through nomination to UNESCO’s World Heritage List. How are these sites chosen? How do we define terms such as universal value, integrity, and authenticity, all prerequisites for listing? What are the consequences of being listed? How can such sites be managed and sustained in the face of the challenges of dramatically increased tourism, climate change, encroaching development and population growth, ethnic conflict and war. How do we engage and preserve the cultural links of people to place? Students will pursue reading on all of these issues and conduct research on a particular site or theoretical issue associated with World Heritage. Active participation in discussion and a willingness to engage the issues as a collaborative effort rather that up-down teacher/student process are expected. Requirements include short reports on reading and a research paper (ca. 15 pages) to be presented as a final oral report.

 

Studies in CHAPS, 16:082:593, Index #70237

Tuesday, 4:30-7:30, VH001, Urban

Curating Guantánamo: Public History and Public Awareness

This course is both an introduction to public history and an examination into the contentious history of the U.S. naval base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. It provides an upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level introduction to the theory, methods, practice, and politics of public history, and allows students to explore the possibilities and challenges of the production and dissemination of histories in nonacademic settings. Students’ work will be part of a collaboration involving universities and colleges across the United States, organized by the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience’s Guantánamo Public Memory Project (http://www.sitesofconscience.org/activities/guantanamo-public-memory-project).

Studies in CHAPS, 16:082:594, Index #72347

Monday, 1:10-4:10, VH001, Kahlaoui

Culture, Preservation, and Politics in the Middle East

The Middle East is one of the richest archeological regions in the world. Yet, ironically, military conflicts aimed at establishing stability in the area have contributed to the deterioration of cultural artifacts and sites at an alarming rate. Military action, political indifference, and a vacuum of knowledge – linguistic, artistic, political, and cultural – have endangered the possibilities for preserving the essence of Middle Eastern art and archaeology and the roots of western European tradition. This course is about war and cultural heritage, politics and preservation as the new realities of our future. This course begins with a review of similar situations of war and art, from napoleon to World War II and Vietnam ("we had to destroy it in order to save it"). Our work then moves quickly to a discussion of Middle Eastern art and archaeology, including the sack of the Iraq museum in Baghdad and the looting of sites in the countryside throughout the region. Half of the course is devoted to understanding both the art and archaeology of the region, and the other half is devoted to tracing their fate and their future under the challenge of present circumstances. This course will answer two questions. The first is: what do we need to know about the art history of Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Syria, and Afghanistan? The second is: what are the threats to its survival for future generations? The course targets art history and CHAPS students. It will emphasize both visual approaches and preservation practices, and their relation to the respective social environments. Requirements will include informal discussion of common readings, oral reports on specific issues, and a 15-page research paper.

Advanced Topics in CHAPS, 16:082:603, index #72349

Wednesday, 4:30-7:30, VH001, Mills

Architectural Preservation: Philosophy and Practice

The course will explore the fundamentals of architectural preservation through a coordinated program of class discussion, fieldwork, documentation, and case studies. Students will study the sources, methods, and standards that inform preservation practice, and will apply the knowledge gained to real world situations. Working individually and in groups, students will gain familiarity with the range of architectural styles, materials, and construction methods that comprise our physical heritage. Case studies and visits to construction sites will illuminate the preservation issues and approaches that are inherent in preservation projects in New Jersey and other parts of the world. New Brunswick’s local neighborhoods and the Rutgers campus will serve as a laboratory for acquiring skills in the assessment of historic structures. Course discussion will tie these issues and methods to broader, global preservation issues. Course requirements include attendance at each scheduled classes , and grades will be assigned based upon a student's attendance and class participation, as well as on the completion of two short papers, a mid-term quiz, and the presentation of a term project. The short papers may serve as components to the term project at the student's discretion, and may assist in its completion. Students will present their work in class or at historic sites on the Rutgers campus. Field trips to preservation projects will be made where possible and appropriate.

Problems in Modern Art, 16:082:657, Index #75619

Thursday, 9:50-12:30, VH001, Yanni & Koven

The City in Britain: A Cultural History

Seth Koven, History, Carla Yanni, Art History

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar, co-taught by an historian and an architectural historian, will explore the city in British history, art, architecture, visual culture, and literature in the 19th and 20th centuries. We approach the city as a built space, as a crucible for the formation of social subjectivities and identities. The city’s history is here broadly conceived to include the entire built environment, from the grand gestures of urban planners to the alleys of the East End; we will study reform attempts, slum clearance, the settlement movement, and model housing. The gendered experience of the city will also be examined. While the focus will be on London, the course will cover other British cities as well, especially as related to the vast social and physical changes wrought by industry and imperialism. Together we will read accounts of the city as it was recorded by tourists, prostitutes, social reformers, architecture critics, aristocrats, and match girls. Emphasis will be placed on using visual sources as historical evidence (popular illustrations, maps, vintage photographs, buildings, urban plans, etc.)

Supported by a Mellon grant to the Rutgers British Studies Center, the seminar will offer students educational opportunities such as visits from eminent scholars from the UK, as well as a one-day conference called The Concrete City: Brutalism and Preservation.

The class will be conducted as a seminar, with requirements including an in-class presentation with images and a fifteen- to twenty-page research paper. It will be open to students from History, Art History, Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies, and other disciplines.

Internship Cultural Heritage/Historic Preservation, 16:082:591, Index #66570

By Arrangment - special permission required.

Advanced Intern/Field Study CHAPS, 16:082:607, Index #72280

By Arrangement - special permission required.

Research Cultural Heritage, 16:082:708, Index #73988

By Arrangement - special permission required.

Directed research by students composing master's theses

________________________________________

Elective courses offered in other departments

American Land Use Policy, 10:762:444, Index #70448

Monday, 12:35-3:35, RAB018, Popper

Exploring the diverse connections between America's national development and its land environment. This is essentially a course in ecological history.

CHAPS
Department of Art History
Voorhees Hall
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
  Phone 848.932.7041
Fax 732.932.1261