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NEW CHAPS PROGRAM in Deparment of Art History

Ph.D. Concentration

in Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies

 

This 12 credit concentration within the Department of Art History Ph.D. program provides participants with the opportunity to broaden and give depth to their art historical/archaeological areas of specialization through the exploration of cross-disciplinary and global approaches to the analysis of monuments, sites and works of art within the context of World Heritage.

NYPAP Screening and NPS Internships

Our Vanishing Legacy: A Screening

Tuesday, October 21, 2014 

Doors open at 6:00 p.m. / Screening at 7:00 p.m. / Short program at 7:30 p.m.

 

You are invited to a rare screening of Our Vanishing Legacy, the first prime-time broadcast advocating preservation efforts in New York City!

First aired on WCBS-TV on September 21, 1961, the short film looks at threats to the City's architectural heritage prior to the passage of the Landmarks Law in 1965, effectively arguing the need to enact legislation to protect significant buildings. The film explores what were then "unofficial" landmarks, including Carnegie Hall, which had been recently saved from demolition, the prospects for the adaptive reuse of the Jefferson Market Courthouse, and commercial threats to the architectural integrity of Grand Central Terminal. From a vandalized Old Merchant's House downtown to encroaching white brick apartment buildings uptown, this rarely-seen footage is remarkable to behold.   

Following the screening, Gordon Hyatt, the film's award-winning writer and producer, will answer questions and share reflections on the making of the film. Join us for an evening celebrating how far preservation has come in the past 50 years!  

 

The event will be held at:

The Loft at Professor Thom's Bar & Restaurant*

219 Second Avenue, btw. E. 13th & E. 14th Sts.

New York City

 

Free, but reservations are required.

To register, please call 212-988-8379

or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

*Food and drinks will be available for purchase

 

Co-sponsored by the New York Preservation Archive Project, the Neighborhood Preservation Center, Historic Districts Council, Preservation Alumni, and Pratt Historic Preservation Alumni.  

 

This program is part of NYC Landmarks50 Alliance, the multi-year celebration of  

the 50th anniversary of New York City's Landmarks Law.

 


 

 

Internship Program

 

The Historic Preservation Internship Training Program trains our future historic preservation professionals.

 

The application deadline for Academic Year 2014-2015 internships with the National Park Service and the Department of the Interior is October 24, 2014.

 

New positions added October 2.            

Application - MS Word Format

Application - Fillable PDF Format

 

The internship program offers undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to gain practical experience in cultural resource management programs in the National Park Service headquarters, field offices, and parks, and in other federal agencies.

 

Working under the direction of experienced historic preservation professionals, students undertake short-term research and administrative projects. Students learn about and contribute to the national historic preservation programs and the federal government’s preservation and management of historic properties.

 

The short-term internships are available in the summer and during the school year. The internship program is operated jointly with the National Council for Preservation Education.

 

Contact Guy Lapsley, Technical Preservation Services, for more information.

 

Call for Papers and Forum UNESCO Announcement

1st International Conference on Fortifications and World Heritage: Challenges in Interpretation and Site Management – 2015, New Delhi

 

Anouk Fienieg

Programme Director Cultural Heritage at DutchCulture, centre for international cooperation

To be secured has remained one of most primal requirement of the human being since time immemorial. From ones’ home to a cluster, a city to a fort or be it the social system the aspect of defense has been omnipresent. In this Conference, ICOFORT India seeks to explore different forms of defense architecture with a special focus on forts of South Asia and little explored history of military organization, intelligence and weaponry that have simultaneously developed with the Forts.

ICOFORT India welcomes from professionals, scholars, researches, defense personnel, strategists, archaeologists, historians, conservationists who have been working in the sphere of defense architecture and forts original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, or theoretical work. This conference aims to provide a platform for the convergence of different perspectives and specializations to further our understanding of the resource.

25 September Deadline for Abstracts
More info: http://icofort2014.wordpress.com/about/

 


 

CHAPS May Workshop, Urban Preservation in Context: Challenges and New Approaches in the Mid-Atlantic Region, has been highlighted in the Forum UNESCO Newsletter!

 

Link: http://www.forumunescochair.upv.es/eng/index.html

 

On May 2, 2014, preservationists, architects, city planners, community leaders, academics and students came together in a workshop at Rutgers University. Focusing on the practical implementation of UNESCO’s Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape (HUL, 2011) in New Jersey, New York, and the entire mid-Atlantic region of the United States, workshop participants discussed the role of public outreach in the urban conservation process, wherein collaboration between political, regulatory, and residential bodies is key to implementing a holistic approach to conservation.

 

See attached PDF for the workshop program and participant biographies.

Boston MFA’s Provenance Research Reveals The Illicit Trade In African Antiquities

 

 by Chasing Aphrodite

Benin altar figure

Last month the Boston Museum of Fine Arts voluntarily returned to Nigeria eight works of art — ranging from a terra-cotta Nok head dating to 500 B.C. to a wooden Kalabari memorial screen from the late 19th century — that the museum concluded had been stolen or looted.

11reed_1.r

The returns were not the result of a claim made by Nigeria but proactive research by the museum’s staff and curator of provenance Victoria Reed, who spent 18 months researching more than 300 objects bequeathed to the museum by William Teel, a wealthy benefactor and MFA overseer until his death in 2012.

africa3

As part of the review, Reed also checked the provenance of 108 objects previously donated by the Teels and the rest of the museum's African and Oceania collection. Most objects had clear title, Reed said. About five objects  remain under review, including a terra-cotta sculpture of a Pregnant Ewe from Mali that has beendescribed as a looted fragment combined with a modern addition.

The MFA should be commended for the proactive research that led to the returns. For decades, the Boston museum bought looted antiquities and dismissed questions about those objects from foreign countries, academics and investigative reporters – showing little regard for the public trust that comes with tax-exempt status. While there is more work to be done on the MFA's collection, the museum's recent behavior makes clear it has turned the page on that ugly history.

To address the mistakes of the past, more museums should follow the lead of the MFA and theDallas Museum of Art by doing what they have done with Nazi-era paintings: proactive, transparent research into the provenance their antiquities collections.

THE AFRICAN TRADE

The Nigerian returns shed light on a branch of the illicit antiquities trade that receives relatively little attention: African art, which in the United States grew in popularity in the 1980s and – after many countries in the region had passed laws to protect their cultural heritage.

The MFA’s research concluded that all eight objects had been looted, stolen or removed from Nigeria without government permission, at times using what appeared to be falsified documents.

Oron Ekpu

One of the objects was an Oron ancestral figure, or ekpu, that survived the Biafran war and was in the Oron museum as of 1970.  In 2001, Teel's records show the figure was acquired by Galerie Walu in Zurich, Switzerland, now owned by Jean David. It was accompanied by a document stating that the National Commission of Museums and Monuments had waived Nigeria's ownership right to the object. The MFA contacted the commission and found that was not the case, suggesting the document was falsified. In an email, David said the object was sold by his father from his private collection, not through the gallery. David said he continues to research questions about the authenticity of the documents and has offered to get back to me with additional information.

Teel 374

A 13th century Yoruba portrait head sold to the Teels by Montreal gallery Lovart International was said to have been in a private collection by 1980. But the MFA's research suggests that a document allegedly signed by the former Director General of Nigeria's National Commission for Museums and Monuments is not authentic. The gallery could not be reached for comment.

Teel 360

The Teel's Nok terracotta head (right) dating perhaps as early as 500 B.C. was said to have been found near Kaduna State, Nigeria and taken to Europe, where it was acquired by the dealer Marc Leo Felix in Brussels. In March, 1994, Felix sold it to the Teels. Felix has not yet responded to my questions about the object.

THE DAVIS GALLERY

The remaining five objects returned by the MFA came through theDavis Gallery in New Orleans. The gallery is owned by Charles Davis, a leading seller of African art since the 1970s.

A brass altar figure from the Benin people, seen at the top of his post, was apparently stolen from an ancestral altar in the Royal Palace of Benin City before the Davis Gallery acquired it in 1997. As the MFA states, "Although the figure was accompanied by documentation that appeared to authorize its sale by the chief of the guild of Benin City's brasscasters, or Igun Eronmwon, inconsistencies within the bill of sale, as well as recent correspondence from the office of the Director General, National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria, have cast doubts upon the authenticity of this document." An 18th century Edo head, below, was also acquired by the gallery in 1990 from the Benin brass casters.

1991 1065

In 1994 the gallery sold a 2,000-year-old Nok sculpture (below) to the Teels on behalf of a dealer named Charles Jones. "Although documentation that appears to authorize the export of this object from Nigeria was issued in 1994, recent correspondence from the office of the Director General, National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria, has cast doubts upon this document's authenticity," the museum found.

Teel 373

I recently spoke with Charles Davis about the MFA’s returns and his role in the market for African art over the years.

Charles and Kent Davis

In the early 1970s, Davis was the director of a Virginia zoo. He and his wife Kent discovered tribal art while traveling across Africa in a Land Rover taking photos. "We traded with the pygmies, with tribes in Zaire,” he recalled. "We didn’t have money so we traded our clothes.”

Over the years, Davis "cultivated friendships with tribal people, traders, and African dealers and began to bring out fabulous objects,” recalled William Fagaly, the New Orleans Museum of Art curator of African Art, in aninterview with Antiques magazine. "At that point, everybody stood up and took notice and in short order he became a dealer's dealer, supplying work to the big boys who dominated the trade."

Davis Gallery

The business of African art was slow until the 1980s, when the opening of the Michael C. Rockefeller Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art put it on the map, Davis said. "When the Met anointed it as fine art in 1981 by opening the Rockefeller Wing, the U.S. recognized it as fine art. Other than that it was worthless." (Needless to say, parts of the Rockefeller Collection were gathered under questionable circumstances.)

Davis estimates he has sold some 10,000 African objects over the years, acquired during more than 150 buying trips to Africa. He says he’s been out of the African art business since 2005, when Katrina devastated his adopted home of New Orleans, where he operates the Davis Gallery out of his 1845 Greek Revival mansion (above) on the banks of the Mississippi. The business of African art has now largely moved to Paris and Brussels, he says.

Asked about the MFA's returns, Davis is philosophical.

"I’ll take the hit," he said. "I knew it was coming. I knew we were getting politically correct that nothing should be exported, and the people be damned."

"I think the MFA has made a mistake,” he said. "To see American institutions to return a lot of the material in this political atmosphere….is going to be disastrous for these objects.” He notes unrest in the region:the terrorist group Boko Haram is active in the area; and during the Biafran war of the late 1960s, he said, a large part of the museum in Oron was looted.

"This is African language," he said. "Africa never had a real written language. Their art was their way of communicating. There are great notions like abstraction that we’ve learned from. To deny this to the rest of world would be a travesty. Without these wonderful objects, without the story being told, there would be no Pablo Picasso. To put prohibition on these things is a step way over the line."

Besides, he said, the trade in African art has greatly benefitted Africans. "The word stolen and looted is incorrect. I’ve seen Sotheby’s catalogs in remote villages. These things are sold as free expressions of their culture. They culminate in very high prices for these objects. They’re very aware of what these things are worth. Dealers like me have pumped millions of millions into Africa so they can buy the medicine they need. It’s a big enterprise and I’m proud that Africans have done extremely well. This is a renewable resource for Africa. People in Africa are very happy with the ability to sell things and realize a great benefit.”

How does Davis explain the falsified documents that apparently came with his objects? "A lot of these items have been sold by government officials. I’ve worked with very high officials who claimed to have the right to do so. I have provided those letters to people when I sold the objects."

One of the pieces, a set of Kalabari screen figures (seen above), dates from the late 19th century, he said. "There were three wooden figures owned by men’s association. They were totally not used and discarded. Someone from that region realized these people wanted to sell them and they did...they worked their way through the pipeline to me. You can return all the archaeologics you want. But to have something as recent as 20 years ago decaying, to have that returned doesn’t make sense."

Who was this middleman? "I don’t want to name the middleman...he was a government official, a member of Parliament….I’m going to protect my sources because philosophically I think they’ve done the world a great service. We’re trying to make sure these objects will survive millennia.”

A Campaign of Repatriation

Despite his opposition to the MFA's returns, Davis says he firmly believes many archaeological objects now in Western collections should eventually be returned to Africa. In the 1980s, he said he proposed a massive campaign of repatriation of antiquities to Mali.

"I wrote a book called Animal Motif. I worked hand in glove with the Musée national du Mali. They told me the French were going to help them build a museum, so I went to see Susan Vogel,” a leading Africanist in the United States.

Davis says he proposed setting up a non-profit foundation so that American collectors could return their objects while receiving a tax benefit. "If clients could donate back to the country of origin and get a tax write-off they would go for it. I think it would be a good program. They can go back to encourage collectors to donate back to the country of origin, rather than having art seized and repatriated."

But Vogel and other American museum curators discouraged him. "She thought it would not be workable,” he recalled. "Let’s watch and wait,” she told him. Others said: "Repatriation to Africa is not advised...The only thing that matters is the conservation of this art."

"We’ve been watching and waiting ever since,” Davis said. "Maybe nows the time to do it.”

Would he support such an effort?

"I’m behind it 100%. It would be nice if there’s a tax incentive to do it. I think here could be a worldwide program to encourage us to do that…I would be first to do it."

Chasing Aphrodite | July 30, 2014 at 6:00 am | Tags: African artBoston Museum of Fine Arts,Charles DavisDallas Museum of ArtDavis GalleryGalerie WaluJean DavidLovart InternationalMarc Leo FelixNigeriaNoktribal artVictoria Reed | Categories: News | URL:http://wp.me/p1lDPb-ON

U.S. National Commission for UNESCO - June 2014 Commission Update

 
U.S.National Commission for UNESCO
 
June 2014 Commission Update
Nix-Hines Confirmed as U.S. Ambassador to UNESCO
 
We are pleased to announce Crystal Nix-Hines has been confirmed by the United States Senate as United States Permanent Representative to UNESCO, with the rank of Ambassador.
 

Crystal Nix-Hines most recently was Of Counsel at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart Oliver & Hedges in Los Angeles.  Previously, she served as Of Counsel at Fairbank & Vincent from 2006 to 2007, Special Counsel in the Litigation Department of O'Melveny & Myers, LLP from 1997 to 2000, and Assistant to the General Counsel/Senior Vice President of Capital Cities/ABC, Inc. from 1992 to 1993.  From 1993 to 1997, she held several positions at the State Department, including Counselor to the Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, Member of the Department's Policy Planning Staff, and Special Assistant to the Legal Adviser.  From 1991 to 1992, she clerked on the U.S. Supreme Court for Justice Thurgood Marshall and Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.  She also clerked for Justice William Norris on the U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit from 1990 to 1991.  During her career, Ms. Nix-Hines has also been a writer and producer on several network television shows such as Commander-in-Chief, Alias, and The Practice.  She began her career as a reporter for The New York Times.  She received an A.B. from Princeton University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Poverty Point, Louisiana World Heritage Site
 

On Sunday, June 22, the Monumental Earthworks of Poverty Point, Louisiana, became the 22nd U.S. site to be inscribed on UNESCO's World Heritage List.  Inscription is a reflection of the "outstanding universal value" of Poverty Point, which "bears a unique or at least exceptional testimony to a cultural tradition or to a civilization which is living or which has disappeared." 

Poverty Point is an extraordinary prehistoric earthwork complex located in Louisiana's Lower Mississippi Valley.  It was part of a trading network 3,000 years ago that stretched hundreds of miles across the North American continent.  Poverty Point is a remarkable system of monumental mounds and ridges that were built into the landscape for residential and ceremonial use by a sophisticated society of hunter-fisher-gatherers.  It is a masterpiece of engineering from its time as the major political, trading, and ceremonial center of North America.  

 

The 38th session of the World Heritage Committee is currently under way in Doha, Qatar, June 15-25.  In addition to Poverty Point, the committee evaluated 36 nominations to the World Heritage List submitted by States Parties to determine which cultural and natural properties of "Outstanding and Universal Value" should be inscribed on the list.  Sites on the World Heritage List are protected under the 1972 Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage. 

 

Learn more about World Heritage: http://whc.unesco.org/

U.S. Youth Observer
 

Created to elevate youth voices in the global policy dialogue, the U.S. Youth Observer at the UN is a role appointed annually by the U.S. Department of State and UN Association of the USA. For a one-year term, an American citizen between the ages of 18-25 is selected to engage young people in the U.S. in the work of the United Nations and international issues. 

  

 

The Youth Observer travels throughout the United States to discover the issues important to young Americans and participates with the U.S. delegation at international organization meetings, such as the UN General Assembly opening debates, the UNESCO Youth Forum, and the Commission on the Status of Women. Application Deadline is June 25, 2014 so apply now.

 

Learn more at:  http://www.unausa.org/membership/us-youth#sthash.gJCM7c0w.dpuf

Our Oceans Conference and World Oceans Day

By Molly Walker

Help Protect Our Ocean

With initiatives and events both at home and abroad there was a worldwide focus on the benefits of oceans and discussing how to best preserve these vital natural resources. On June 10, UNESCO welcomed annual World Oceans Day by releasing the Ocean and Climate Platform of 2015, which links relevant stakeholders in an effort to prepare for the upcoming United Nations Climate Change Convention.

 

Also this month, Secretary of State John Kerry hosted the "Our Oceans" conference at the U.S. Department of State, bringing together experts and foreign leaders to encourage a conversation on key areas such as sustainable fisheries, marine pollution, and ocean acidification. 

 

As a Department of State intern, I was lucky enough to view some of the exhibits at the conference and speak with the experts about pressing issues regarding the seas that face the international community. I found myself in awe of the amount of people globally dependent upon oceans for their livelihood. Similarly, it demonstrated how interconnected countries are via their impacts on oceans, bringing a real understanding of the need for "international cooperation."

 

During the conference, President Obama announced that he will take steps to protect vast portions of the Pacific by creating a marine sanctuary, while also devoting attention to areas of the Atlantic coastline that see their features increasingly damaged by climate change. The plan will create the world's largest marine sanctuary, covering hundreds of thousands of miles. During President Obama's video remarks he stressed the importance of our oceans "We know how fragile our blue planet can be. If we ignore these problems, we won't just be squandering one of humanity's greatest treasures, we'll be cutting off one of our major sources of food and economic growth." 

Learn more about World Oceans Day at: http://unesco.usmission.gov/worldoceanday2014.html

Read more about the Our Oceans Conference: http://ourocean2014.state.gov/

Croke Park Symposium on Youth Civic Engagement and Leadership through Sport and Recreation 
 

Professor Mark Brennan (Pennsylvania State University), along with Professors Pat Dolan (NUI-Galway) and Alan Smith (University of Ulster) have announced the "Croke Park Symposium on Youth Civic Engagement and Leadership through Sport and Recreation."   

The Symposium will be held August 28, 2014 at Croke Park Stadium to highlight and advance international youth development.  The symposium will bring together experts, practitioners, members of development organizations and youth leaders to create innovative solutions to issues that directly impact youth and their communities.

"The active engagement and development of leadership skills among youth is essential to international security, stability, regional capacity building, and increased quality of life worldwide.  This symposium will bring together UNESCO chairs from across the globe, along with practitioners and members of development organizations, subject-matter experts, and youth leaders to showcase and exchange their experiences and best practices in this area." Dr. Brennan stated in announcing the symposium.

The symposium will develop a series of key policy directions and a major formal declaration on utilizing sports and recreation as mechanisms for youth development worldwide.  In addition, they will announce  a new Global Network of UNESCO Chairs on Children, Youth, and Community, bringing together six chairs, 50 universities and institutions and more than 400 individuals across six continents.

For more information: http://agsci.psu.edu/unesco/croke-park-symposium

Seabourn UNESCO Partnership
By Molly Walker

Cruise ship company Seabourn will be partnering with UNESCO for a six-year agreement to provide travelers with the opportunity to visit World Heritage sites and learn from site experts. The partnership will promote sustainable tourism and protect current World Heritage sites from future damage. When travelers opt to participate in excursions to sites, a portion of those costs will be given to support the fund for World Heritage. In the long term, an expected one million dollars will be raised for UNESCO through the partnership with Seabourn.

UNESCO Director-General Bokova recently noted, "With this partnership UNESCO and Seabourn truly demonstrate our shared commitment in safeguarding World Heritage by promoting sustainable tourism at these iconic destinations. The partnership enables us to reach the traveling public with our conservation message which is universal in scope and so important to the dialogue and mutual understanding that are needed to nurture a culture of peace."

 

Learn more: http://whc.unesco.org/en/news/1145 

 

http://www.seabourn.com/pageByName/Simple.action?requestPage=unesco

Beyond 2015: The Education We Want

UNESCO and UNICEF are hosting a high-level discussion in Brussels, Belgium on June 26th to "promote a bold new agenda for education and to build support for its inclusion as a central pillar in the post-2015 development framework."  This discussion will be part of a larger Global Partnership for Education (GPE) Replenishment Conference in Brussels on June 25-26.


Stemming from the 2014 Muscat Agreement, where leaders in education from across the globe committed to focus international support behind the goal to "ensure equitable and inclusive quality education and lifelong learning for all by 2030." In addition, the education leaders recommended seven global targets to spur action. The intent of the discussion is to "mobilize education champions to create the political and financial will needed to deliver the education agenda." 

 

Learn more about the Global Partnership on Education: http://www.globalpartnership.org

Trafficking in Persons Report  

We each have a responsibility to make this horrific and all-too-common crime a lot less common. And our work with victims is the key that will open the door to real change - not just 

on behalf of the more than 44,000 survivors who have been identified in the past year, but also for the more than 20 million victims of trafficking who have not.

As Secretary of State, I've seen with my own two eyes countless individual acts of courage and commitment. I've seen how victims of this crime can become survivors and how survivors can become voices of conscience and conviction in the cause.

This year's Trafficking in Persons Report offers a roadmap for the road ahead as we confront the scourge of trafficking." -- John F. Kerry, Secretary of State

Laura Bush Traveling Fellowship  

The U.S. National Commission is currently accepting applications for the Laura Bush Traveling Fellowship.  The Fellowship is intended to help fund a proposal designed by a student to conduct brief work in a foreign country related to the mandate of UNESCO - using education, natural sciences, social and human sciences, culture, and/or communication and information to build strong ties among nations. 

The fellowship open to US citizens (ages 18-25) enrolled in a college or university who express an interest in international collaboration but have not had many opportunities to travel abroad. The application deadline is Monday, September 22, 2014. 

Read more about the Fellowship & recipients: http://www.state.gov/p/io/unesco/programs

News from Paris
 

Recently the U.S. Mission to UNESCO sponsored a screening of the 2012 award-winning 

film Bully to highlight the global anti-bullying work led by UNESCO.  The screening and panel discussion titled, "The Bullying Crisis Worldwide and Its Impact on Education for All," were organized in partnership with UNESCO's Section on HIV and Health Education; U.S.-based Non-governmental Organization GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network); and The Bully Project, a social advocacy project inspired by the film. Bully chronicles the pained and often endangered lives of bullied kids in the United States, and reveals a problem that transcends geographic, racial, ethnic, and economic borders.

Girl Up
 By Molly Walker
 

The United Nations Foundation "Girl Up" leadership summit convened between June 16 and 18 in the nation's capital. Girl Up's mission is to empower American girls by working to shine light on an array of UN initiatives targeted toward improving the lives of young women across the globe that live in dire situations.

The program included a variety of workshops and speakers along with a day of advocacy on Capitol Hill. Participants were able to engage with Congressional members in the hopes of sparking discussion about the Girls Count Act, a bill that seeks to improve birth registries in developing countries.

Call for Literacy Prize Applications

  

The UNESCO International Literacy Prizes reward excellence and innovation in the field of literacy throughout the world. Since 1967, UNESCO has awarded the Prizes to over 460 projects and programs. They have launched a call for nominations of candidates for 2014 under the theme "Literacy and Sustainable Development".

The Prizes consist of the three UNESCO Confucius Prizes for Literacy and the two UNESCO King Sejong Literacy Prizes. Governments of Member States and Non-Governmental Organizations maintaining official relations with UNESCO are invited to submit their nominations.  Entries must be received by June 27th. Interested parties should contact the U.S. National Commission by June 25th at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

For more information: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/education/themes/education-building-blocks/literacy/literacy-prizes/

UNESCO Collection of Traditional Music Released by Smithsonian Folkways 

  

Originally published between 1961 and 2003 but until now out of print, the

UNESCO Collection of Traditional Music is composed of more than 125 albums from around the world. The entire collection, including many previously unreleased recordings, will be published by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings in both digital and physical formats. Two albums will be published per week. With recordings from over 70 nations, the UNESCO Collection of Traditional Music offers an impressive diversity of material.  

 

To access the recordings: http://www.folkways.si.edu/unesco

Careers in International Organizations
 
The Department of State launched an International Organization Careers website to help U.S. citizens explore exciting opportunities in the UN and other International Organizations. The website features a searchable database tool to help you find job openings in specific organizations, areas of expertise, and various locations around the world. International organizations are often looking for qualified candidates, including in the areas of international affairs, administration, architecture, computer science, and legal affairs. 
 
Click here to visit the site and learn more. 

If you have information, news or updates related to UNESCO please let us know.  By sharing your stories and information I hope to keep our community up to date on how UNESCO benefits everyday lives.  
Dates to Note
 
 
6/25/2014. Brussels, Belgium, High-Level Event on Education Post-2015
 
6/26/2014, Warsaw, Poland, Memory of the World Experts' Meeting
 
8/12/2014, Paris, France, International Youth Day 2014 
 
9/8/2014, Paris, France, International Literacy Day
 
10/15/2014, Paris, France, 195th session of the Executive Board
 
11/6/2014, Washington, DC, Annual Meeting of the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO

 

Contact: Allison Wright
U.S. Department of State | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  | 202.663.0024

 

 

CHAPS
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